Classical Soprano – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saturova.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-1-150x150.png Classical Soprano – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ 32 32 Creative Places Baltinglass will launch on Friday with an exciting Culture Night program https://saturova.cz/creative-places-baltinglass-will-launch-on-friday-with-an-exciting-culture-night-program/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://saturova.cz/creative-places-baltinglass-will-launch-on-friday-with-an-exciting-culture-night-program/ The County WICKLOW Arts Office is pleased to launch Creative Places Baltinglass with a special cultural evening program taking place this Friday. Following a successful bid led by Wicklow County Council in partnership with local community development organizations in Baltinglass and West Wicklow, the people of Baltinglass will benefit from a £375,000 investment package awarded […]]]>

The County WICKLOW Arts Office is pleased to launch Creative Places Baltinglass with a special cultural evening program taking place this Friday.

Following a successful bid led by Wicklow County Council in partnership with local community development organizations in Baltinglass and West Wicklow, the people of Baltinglass will benefit from a £375,000 investment package awarded by the Council arts to develop and support new creative opportunities. for all age groups over the next three years.

Creative Places is an opportunity for places that have not had sustained arts investment in the past to create local arts programs that will benefit local people. Each program will have a coordinator and the approach is inclusive and diverse and rooted in socially engaged practice and community development principles. It builds on existing cultural strengths and is driven by community input and ideas and supported by artists.

Culture Night is an annual celebration of culture, creativity and the arts across the island. It seeks to actively promote the rich and varied culture cherished and nurtured in the lives of people, today and every day, across Ireland.

To mark the launch of Creative Places Baltinglass, the inaugural Baltinglass Culture Night program includes a Bodhrán Buzz family workshop where children and adults will learn how to hold the bodhran and staff and master the basics to get the first beats.

Harpist Aisling Ennis, soprano Catherine Redding and local author Robert Barrett present a classic recital of beautiful, evocative and charming selections from Fauré, Debussy, Bellini and Strauss entitled “Songs to the Moon”.

West Wicklow-based traditional sensations Kila will perform as part of their tour celebrating 35 years of songwriting and wowing audiences with their unique brand of Trad Fusion.

Supporting Kíla are The Voyagers, a four-piece band of guitar, violin, flute and bodhran with powerful vocal arrangements. Their 30-minute opening set will feature an eclectic mix of contemporary trad while bringing a fresh sound to traditional songs.

In partnership with Wicklow Library Services, Baltinglass Library will also host two activities, including a felt-making workshop with Tamzen Lundy where children aged 5-12 will learn the basics of wet felting, the oldest form of textile making in world.

Painting workshops with local artist Maura O’Halloran will also take place, where children and adults will be inspired by local landmarks and learn tips and tricks. Perfect for beginners.

All activities and events that are part of the Baltinglass Culture Night program are free and booking is advised by visiting www.CultureNight.ie/Wicklow.

Cathaoirleach of Wicklow County Council, Cllr Tommy Annesley, said: “The Baltinglass community is extremely delighted to have received this investment through the Arts Council‘s Creative Places initiative. The amount of investment is unprecedented and will be truly welcomed.

Wicklow County Council chief executive Mr Brian Gleeson said the bid was well supported by the area’s community and voluntary sector and they would now continue to work together to ensure the initiative will have maximum impact.

Arts Council Director Maureen Kennelly said: “We are delighted to award Creative Places Baltinglass; it’s not a place we haven’t been able to invest in before and it’s very important to us that public investment in the arts reaches and benefits more people in a sustainable and meaningful way. We are very excited to see how the people of Baltinglass will respond to what matters most to them, and look forward to working more with the community and Wicklow County Council.

During the fall, the Creative Places Baltinglass program will be set up, a coordinator will be appointed and conversations with the community will begin.

]]>
The Glenn Gould Prize is awarded to renowned conductor Gustavo Dudamel https://saturova.cz/the-glenn-gould-prize-is-awarded-to-renowned-conductor-gustavo-dudamel/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 17:23:55 +0000 https://saturova.cz/the-glenn-gould-prize-is-awarded-to-renowned-conductor-gustavo-dudamel/ Gustavo Dudamel, one of the world’s most acclaimed conductors, is the 2022 winner of the $100,000 Glenn Gould Prize. The award was announced Sunday in Toronto at the Royal Conservatory of Music’s TELUS Center for Performance and Learning. It was the culmination of a weekend of events organized by the Glenn Gould Foundation to mark […]]]>

Gustavo Dudamel, one of the world’s most acclaimed conductors, is the 2022 winner of the $100,000 Glenn Gould Prize.

The award was announced Sunday in Toronto at the Royal Conservatory of Music’s TELUS Center for Performance and Learning. It was the culmination of a weekend of events organized by the Glenn Gould Foundation to mark the 90th anniversary of the birth of a famous Canadian pianist.

“It was one of the greatest honors of my life when, in 2008, my maestro José Antonio Abreu was named the Glenn Gould Prize winner. To now receive this prestigious award myself is something that fills me with deep gratitude,” Dudamel said in a statement.

He is musical and artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and musical director of the Opéra National de Paris and the Orchester Symphonique Simón Bolívar. His busy schedule did not allow him to be present for the announcement.

“The greatest art brings to light the best of us and reminds us of all that unites us. Likewise, the work of geniuses like Maestro Abreu and Glenn Gould is a beacon that shows us the way to create a better world together. “said the Venezuelan conductor.

The Glenn Gould Prize celebrates artistic excellence, innovation and humanitarianism. Nominees from a wide range of creative disciplines are nominated around the world by members of the general public. Originally awarded every three years, but since 2014 every two years, the prize was first awarded in 1987 to Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer.

Among the 14 winners of the award to date are the likes of American composer Philip Glass, American soprano Jessye Norman, Canadian jazz pianist Oscar Peterson and José Antonio Abreu, the Venezuelan musician and activist best known for founding a program of music education funded by public funds and of international influence. called El Systema.

The foundation launched a complementary protected award in 1993, with the recipient choosing the main award winner. In 2008, Abreu appointed the then 27-year-old Dudamel. He is the first Glenn Gould Award recipient to be a past recipient of the Protected Award. In due course, Dudamel, 41, will announce his own winner’s pick for the $25,000 prize.

In October 2009, Abreu and Dudamel were celebrated in Toronto when Dudamel led the Simón Bolivar Youth Orchestra of Caracas—composed of El Sistema graduates like Dudamel himself—in their sold-out Canadian debut. Shortly thereafter, Dudamel assumed his current position with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. He was appointed musical director of the Opéra National de Paris in August 2021. Dudamel retains his association with what is now called the Orchester Symphonique Simón Bolívar.

Dudamel is one of the most prominent, popular and popular conductors in the world today. He conducted the score for Steven Spielberg’s 2021 film adaptation of “West Side Story”, the opening and closing credits of John Williams’ 2015 “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”, performed with the LA Philharmonic at the 2019 Academy Awards, and performed in the 2016 Super Bowl Halftime Show with Coldplay, Beyoncé and Bruno Mars.

His stellar reputation is built not only on his charismatic podium presence and extraordinary musical talent, but also on his passionate commitment to music education and the spread of classical music to underserved communities.

Michael Crabb is a freelance writer who covers dance and opera for The Star.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Conversations are the opinions of our readers and are subject to the Code of conduct. The Star does not share these opinions.
]]>
Best Welsh Songs | Classical music https://saturova.cz/best-welsh-songs-classical-music/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 19:02:25 +0000 https://saturova.cz/best-welsh-songs-classical-music/ Wales is justifiably proud of its singing heritage. The song, both religious and secular, is hugely important to Welsh culture – it’s not for nothing that it’s often known as the Land of Song. In particular, choral music is an essential part of the country’s musical repertoire, with many of the world famous Welsh choirs. […]]]>

Wales is justifiably proud of its singing heritage. The song, both religious and secular, is hugely important to Welsh culture – it’s not for nothing that it’s often known as the Land of Song. In particular, choral music is an essential part of the country’s musical repertoire, with many of the world famous Welsh choirs.

Here are some of the best known and most loved traditional Welsh songs.

The best Welsh songs

“We’ll keep a welcome (in the hills)”

The music for this popular song was composed in 1940 by Welsh songwriter and artist Mai Jones, while the lyrics came from lyricists Lyn Joshua and Jimmy Harper. Originally introduced for the BBC’s wartime radio variety show Welsh Rare Bitthe song has retained strong associations with Wales.

Originally broadcast on the BBC Forces programme, Welsh Rare Bit was aimed at Welsh serving in the armed forces during the Second World War. We will keep a welcome was written as closing music for each episode.

Welsh Rare Bit was then transferred to the BBC Light programme, where it became the most popular show in 1949. We will keep a welcome quickly became a popular post-war song: indeed, in the 1950s the song was sometimes referred to as “the second national anthem of Wales”.

The song got its first and second recordings in 1949. Later, in 1956, the great Welsh singer, present and comedian Harry Secombe also recorded a version.

‘Sosban Fach’ (‘Small Casserole’)

A traditional Welsh folk song, Sosban-Fach (or ‘Little Saucepan’) is a well-known and much-loved Welsh-language song. A domestic vignette involving an overworked housewife, a crying baby and a small pot boiling over the fire, the song has close associations with rugby club Llanelli RFC and, more recently, regional rugby team the Scarlets.

These links emerged through Llanelli’s tinning industry: generations of pans and other kitchen utensils were tinned in the town and then sold to the British public. The town’s industry and its most famous song are also remembered in the Scarlets’ official magazine, Sosban.

Famous Welsh bass-baritone Bryn Terfel recorded the song on his 2000 album We will keep a welcome.

]]>
LE MARRIAGE DE FIGARO at Opera San José transports the action to India’s colorful north https://saturova.cz/le-marriage-de-figaro-at-opera-san-jose-transports-the-action-to-indias-colorful-north/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:45:15 +0000 https://saturova.cz/le-marriage-de-figaro-at-opera-san-jose-transports-the-action-to-indias-colorful-north/ Mozart’s exuberant Bollywood-style finale Figaro’s wedding at the San Jose Opera Opera San José’s vibrant new production of Mozart’s perennial audience favorite Figaro’s wedding delivers a host of delights, including a pair of bright central performances and a stage awash with color. The latter is courtesy of resetting the opera to northern India, rather than […]]]>
Mozart’s exuberant Bollywood-style finale Figaro’s wedding at the San Jose Opera

Opera San José’s vibrant new production of Mozart’s perennial audience favorite Figaro’s wedding delivers a host of delights, including a pair of bright central performances and a stage awash with color. The latter is courtesy of resetting the opera to northern India, rather than Spain, though a reference to a character’s banishment to Seville seems to fake that point. The change of location is enhanced by the cast of many singers of Asian descent and is temperamentally in tune with the opera, as Mozart’s effervescent music and DaPonte’s amorous libretto seem to lead organically to the Bollywood-style dance number. which concludes the production. Beyond the inclusion of some traditional Indian dances and embedded cultural references (e.g. cricket bats appear during an Act I tune for Figaro), this is actually a narrative fairly simple opera, sung in the original Italian. The plot remains unchanged, centering on Figaro and his beloved Susanna, who are in the employ of Count Almaviva, who also has an eye on Susanna. If anything, I wish director Brad Dalton had gone a bit further with his rather light-hearted approach, as certain issues such as British colonialism are implicitly hinted at without being fully developed into meaningful themes.

Review: LE MARRIAGE DE FIGARO at Opera San José transports the action to India's colorful north
Foreground: Maya Kherani (L) as Susanna and Efraín Solís as Figaro (R)
in the Opera San José production of Figaro’s wedding

Despite its enduring popularity, Figaro can be a difficult opera to perform. With so many individual characters having significant stage time and an intrigue-laden libretto involving all sorts of mismatched lovers, disguised characters and family secrets finally revealed, the music can end up being overwhelmed with shenanigans. With its many ensemble runs, it’s a tall order to keep all the plates rotating and everyone in the cast on the same page, and on that account the production largely succeeds, if at times lacking in detail. a sense of forward thrust during its three hours. -more operating time.

Review: LE MARRIAGE DE FIGARO at Opera San José transports the action to India's colorful north
Left to right: Maria Natale as Countess Almaviva, Deepa Johnny as Cherubino and Maya Kherani as Susanna
in the Opera San José production of Figaro’s wedding

The many roles featured were all pleasantly sung and everyone seemed to know when to step into the spotlight and when to retreat to the background. Mezzo-soprano Deepa Johnny as Cherubino gave a lovely retelling of the opera’s most famous aria, “Voi che sapete”, although she seemed to struggle a bit to find a coherent physique for her role. of pants. Baritone Eugene Brancoveanu was an impressive-voiced Count Almaviva, appropriately pompous without being entirely off-putting. Soprano Maria Natale made Almaviva an attractive Countess, particularly in her meditative Act II aria ‘Poggi amor’ and shimmering Act III duet ‘Che soave zeffiretto’ with Susanna.

At the center of the production are two glorious performances by Efraín Solís in the title role and Maya Kherani as Susanna. While neither vocalist is one to stun you with the sheer force of their lung power, both possess beautifully expressive vocals and warm, exceptionally winning stage presences. They sang beautifully throughout, bringing nuance and lively musicality to Mozart’s melodies while clearly articulating the text and playing up the underlying emotions.

Solís was particularly effective in his plaintive and tragicomic recitative of Act IV “Tutto è disposto / Aprite un po’ quegli occhi” and followed with some skillful and silent comic antics behind the tenderly tender aria “Deh vieni non tardar” by Kherani, which was the highlight of the whole performance. The sheer beauty of Kherani’s golden soprano is marvelous, as is her ability to infuse her character with courage and wit to make it clear that Susanna might be caught in circumstances that aren’t her fault, but she don’t be fooled. She and Solís have a level of connection and chemistry that is rare in the world of opera and gives their scenes a wonderful sense of spontaneity. They are the very antithesis of the old school “park and bark” style of opera performers.

Review: LE MARRIAGE DE FIGARO at Opera San José transports the action to India's colorful north
Maya Kehrani as Susanna sings “Deh vieni non tardar” under the gaze of Efraín Solís as Figaro
in the Opera San José production of Figaro’s wedding

Scenographer Steven C.Kemp offers a succession of eye-catching sets, each more striking than the next, including a sumptuous peacock-inspired bedroom in Act II and an ornate fountain in Act IV supported by a gilded arch adorned with heliotrope curtains lit so brightly by the designer Anshuman Bhatia that they seem practically in levitation. Costume designer Deepsikha Chatterjee makes wonderful use of an extravagant variety of Indian patterns and colors, but my favorite was actually her extremely simple and beautiful cream-colored wedding suit for Figaro, accessorized with a matching vermilion scarf. Susanna’s embellished dress.

Conductor Viswa Subbaraman led the 36-piece orchestra in an accurate account of Mozart’s score, always attentive to the singers’ needs. Antara Bhardwaj’s Indian classical and folk dance-inspired choreography is a neat idea that only felt partially realized, culminating in a cheery, if rather truncated, Bollywood finale. Oh, how I wish she had permission to make the whole production really dance.

Review: LE MARRIAGE DE FIGARO at Opera San José transports the action to India's colorful north
In the foreground: Efraín Solís in the role of Figaro (in the center) shows some movements for Eugene Brancoveanu as Count Almaviva (R)
in Act IV of the San José Opera production of Figaro’s wedding

Either way, it’s a richly rewarding evening. What a pleasure to experience great opera in the relatively intimate confines of the beautiful California theater, where you are close enough to the stage to really feel the energy of the performers. In its ability to produce works of this caliber, the San José Opera once again proves that it is one of the jewels of the Bay Area art scene.

(all photos by David Allen)


The San José Opera production of Figaro’s wedding is sung in Italian, with surtitles in English and Spanish. Performances continue through September 25, 2022 at the California Theater, 345 South 1st Street, San Jose, CA. The duration is approximately 3h10, including an intermission. For more information or to buy tickets, visit operasj.org or call (408) 437-4450.

]]>
An exciting young baritone is born https://saturova.cz/an-exciting-young-baritone-is-born/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 13:03:14 +0000 https://saturova.cz/an-exciting-young-baritone-is-born/ Baritone Kris Gonzales at the Minamahal show at the CCP. Photo by Vangie Oliquino. The Friends for Cultural Concerns of the Philippines (FCCP) staging of Minamahal Kita on Thursday night (September 15) in the main theater lobby of the PCC produced a handsome young baritone singing Abelardo’s Bituing Marikit with rare artistry and consumes. The […]]]>
Baritone Kris Gonzales at the Minamahal show at the CCP. Photo by Vangie Oliquino.

The Friends for Cultural Concerns of the Philippines (FCCP) staging of Minamahal Kita on Thursday night (September 15) in the main theater lobby of the PCC produced a handsome young baritone singing Abelardo’s Bituing Marikit with rare artistry and consumes.

The wood was suave and delicately defined, the diction clear. To top it off, he played the artistic Filipino song and made it into something lovely without the allure of vocal calisthenics.

As expected, the audience erupted in applause followed by a shower of bravos. Indeed, we haven’t heard a baritone of this quality for a very, very long time.

He is none other than Kris Gonzales, 21, a fourth-year communication arts student at Ateneo de Manila University.

We can all go back to the distinguished baritones of our time (Gamaliel Viray, Nomer Son to the youngest, the late Andrew Fernando and Noel Azcona) and tell ourselves that we have had a pretty good harvest.

Even though Kris only received two songs and a token duet at the CCP show, his performance was so marked and his piece performed with elan that one could simply conclude: an exciting young baritone was born.

Her promise did not go unnoticed during her first international singing competition.

Kris Gonzales at the Victoria Theater in Singapore with his second award plaque.

Kris won second place in the recently concluded Youth Opera Competition and Festival in Singapore. “My mentor – Christopher Arceo – encouraged me to enter the competition. He felt that I was ready to test the international stage.

He sang two contrasting competition pieces – The Raging Flames Arise from Handel’s Oratorio, Joshua and Hugo Wolf’s Verborgenheit. “It was one of my most cherished experiences as a singer. It was special because I was representing our country. I realized a greater demand to share opera with audiences in the post-modern world. I believe that opera remains relevant even to this day. I’m glad that my fellow singers in Singapore are also aware of this. We were honored to share this responsibility together.

Her voice lessons began at the age of five after watching Phantom of the Opera in New York. “I tried to copy Christine Daae. When we returned to Manila, my formal classes began.

It helped that he came from a family that loved music. “My parents have both been choristers in our parish choir for 24 years.”

Kris Gonzales (third from right) with other Asian winners of the Singapore Youth Opera Competition and Festival). From Kris Gonzales’ FB page.

Over the past five years he has focused on improving his baritone sound. “I joined the De La Salle Zobel High School Choir and am currently a member and bass section leader of the Ateneo de Manila College Glee Club. I am also privately supervised by the studio of Christopher Arceo, principal conductor of the Chœur d’Aleron.

One of his earliest teachers was his neighbor, choirmaster Tessie Agana-Santos, a contemporary of National Fides Music Artist Cuyugan Asensio. “Thanks to her, I learned very young to appreciate classical music. It is also thanks to her that I began to learn the mechanism of my instrument and how to use it well as a young soprano at the time.

He realized he was a baritone at age 15. “I notice that I was still in the bass section in different choirs at that time. My teacher (Arceo) has been one of the greatest mentors I’ve had in a long time. I love his philosophy of vocal freedom and the way he makes me listen to my body so that I can use my instrument in a way that is sustainable and true to my body’s capabilities. Thanks to him, I started to master my squillo (the resonant sound of the trumpet in the voice of opera singers) and I gradually reconciled my use of vowels. I have also placed more emphasis on breathing pressure and lowering the larynx to remove unnecessary tension from the body that can impede my vocal production. I enjoy being a baritone because it gives me the best of both worlds. Being able to achieve both the brightness of the upper registers and the dramatic colors that the lower notes can bring. I cling to it because there is greater opportunity (for me at least) to show more varied emotions and dispositions.

As a teenager, he enjoyed listening to the late Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky. “I love his vocal clarity and commendable acting prowess.”

Among Filipino singers, he has admiration and respect for his contemporaries like Ivan Nery, Michelle Mariposa and Stefanie Quintin-Avila. “I like them because of a shared high degree of understanding of their instruments with vocal qualities that set the standard for young singers like me.”

Kris has now learned to integrate her life as a singer into her academic load. “I am happy that my teachers also support my craft. My daytime schedule is mostly devoted to my studies and my thesis work while the evenings are devoted to my musical projects like my rehearsals with the Ateneo de Manila College Glee Club.

Poster for the September 18 recital at UP Diliman.

What is he always trying to achieve every time he sings? “A high degree of commitment to my character every time I sing. On top of all that, I always take steps to make sure my larynx is always low, my vowels are reconciled, and my breath pressure is always in the right place. My teacher, Mr. Arceo, also taught me this – that vocal production should be completely independent of how my face and body react to my playing.”

In the future, he always imagined himself opening the opera Turandot in the role of the Mandarin proclaiming the three riddles and imminent death to those who did not answer them correctly. “I also wanted to sing the role of Scarpia in Tosca. Te Deum should be one of my favorite tunes both in its music and in its extravagance. I can see myself performing on the set filled with the religious opulence and grandeur of that era.

(Kris Gonzales and other voice students will be heard at the Arceo Voice Studio recital, Sunday, September 18 at 4 p.m. at Church of the Risen Lord, Diliman, Quezon City.)

]]>
Salzedo: the forgotten part of 20th century English classical music https://saturova.cz/salzedo-the-forgotten-part-of-20th-century-english-classical-music/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 13:48:21 +0000 https://saturova.cz/salzedo-the-forgotten-part-of-20th-century-english-classical-music/ Leonard Salzedo conducted the recording of Spanish Fiesta, which included his own Divertimento Espagñol. Photo: Courtesy of Caroline Salzedo He was a prolific composer of ballet and orchestral scores evoking the rhythms of his Sephardic roots, but best known for a 10-second trumpet fanfare that once heralded BBC broadcasts for the Open University. Yet Leonard […]]]>

Leonard Salzedo conducted the recording of Spanish Fiesta, which included his own Divertimento Espagñol. Photo: Courtesy of Caroline Salzedo

He was a prolific composer of ballet and orchestral scores evoking the rhythms of his Sephardic roots, but best known for a 10-second trumpet fanfare that once heralded BBC broadcasts for the Open University.

Yet Leonard Salzedo remains the forgotten man of 20th-century English classical music, rarely performed and little recorded, with an hour-long requiem he considered one of his finest works yet to be premiered 22 years later. his death.

All that could be about to change with an upcoming concert at Conway Hall in Holborn to celebrate his diverse musical heritage featuring former friends and colleagues including violist Richard Crabtree, bandleader and pianist Leslie Howard. as well as mezzo-soprano Lotte Betts. -Dean.

It’s organized by the Leonard Salzedo Society which his daughters, Caroline and Sue, started in 2018. “We really want to raise Leonard’s profile and get his work out there, performed and recorded,” says Caroline. “He was highly respected and wrote many plays, but somehow he got left behind.”

Although a rising star in the 1950s, Salzedo found himself facing the controversial BBC Music Review Panel, a kind of chamber of musical stars which, until 1967, decided which scores could be played on the third program. . At the time, it was the only classical music radio station, and musical tastes were generally conservative.

“The jury accepted very few of his pieces,” she says. “It was almost like a closed workshop. You had to be on their list to get a radio show, so my dad was barely on the radar. It didn’t help that he wasn’t a great networker or good at promoting himself.

The concert will begin with the cheerful Divertimento for three trumpets and three trombones whose opening notes were taken over by the Open University as a theme in the 1970s for 20 years. Instantly recognizable, it was one of more than 180 works he wrote during a long career that began as a virtuoso violinist.

Born in Stamford Hill in 1921, he likely inherited his talent from his father, an amateur gambler whose ancestors were Jews who fled persecution in Spain in the 15th century. Salzedo began learning to play the violin at the age of six and was already composing at the age of 13.

“There was a lot of tension between his parents when he was growing up and for my father, music was a companion, a sanctuary and a vocation”, explains Caroline, a shiatsu practitioner.

He then became a star student at the Royal College of Music, where he won first prize for composition, followed by the Tagore Gold Medal for Outstanding Student of the Year, awarded to him by Princess Elizabeth in 1943 .

In the 1950s he was a violinist for the London Philharmonic Orchestra and then the Royal Philharmonic, working with luminaries such as Matthew Arnold and Thomas Beecham, but independent as a composer, providing the music for Hammer’s 1957 horror film . Frankenstein’s Revenge.

His gift for composition was spotted by Marie Rambert, who commissioned him to write for her company, the Ballet Rambert, beginning with Le Fugitive in 1944. A collaboration that would last 30 years, including five as musical director.

His ease in expressing drama, energy and emotion was also evident in his piano scores for Les Ballets Nègres, formed in London by two Jamaican dancers to become Britain’s first black ballet company, which he joined. in 1946 with his new wife Pat Clover.

The move reflected an adventurous spirit and a willingness to take his work in new directions.

“My father was very proud of his Sephardic heritage and was interested in Kabbalah and other Jewish traditions. You can hear it in the melodies and rhythms of his work. But he also liked to learn new things,” adds Caroline. “He loved folk music and adored jazz, especially Duke Ellington who was a big influence.”

Salzedo, who died in 2000 at the age of 78, also drew on his training as an orchestral player, allowing him to embrace winds, percussion, brass and piano with brilliant inventiveness.

“He wrote very well for strings but became interested in so many other instruments after playing in orchestras,” she continues. “You can tell from his plays that he had insider knowledge.”

He wrote 17 ballet scores, the most successful being 1955’s The Witch Boy, which was subsequently performed around the world. He then became Principal Conductor of Scottish Ballet and from 1982 to 1986 was Music Director of London City Ballet.

Subsequently, he devoted himself to composition, producing 10 string quartets, the Stabat Mater for soprano, alto, choir and orchestra, a violin concerto, a piano concerto and, in 1989, Requiem Sine Voxibus which Salzedo considered one of his finest achievements but which was never executed.

Caroline remembers when her father worked full time but still found time to write music, sitting at the desk he had built for himself in his Wembley home, looking like he was in a other world.

“He often wrote early in the morning and even when he went on tour he took manuscripts with him to work on. He was away a lot and we missed him a lot. But he was great fun and loved taking my sister and I to the movies to watch cartoons all day.

Since its launch, the Leonard Salzedo Society has been digitizing his scores, which are archived at the Royal College of Music, and recording more of his work. Last year, a 20-minute documentary, Leonard Salzedo A Life Composed in Music, was made to mark his centenary and is available on YouTube.

“It’s been fabulous to do all of this,” says Caroline. “My father’s work deserves to be better known and we hope that the concert will help to make it known even more.

The Leonard Salzedo Celebration Concert takes place at Conway Hall, WC1R 4RL, September 24 at 6 p.m. Tickets from £12.50 to £17.50. www.conwayhall.org.uk/whats-on/event/leonard-salzedo-celebration-concert/

]]>
AUREA ENSEMBLE PRESENTS a concert celebrating the ideals of democracy and equality https://saturova.cz/aurea-ensemble-presents-a-concert-celebrating-the-ideals-of-democracy-and-equality/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:48:33 +0000 https://saturova.cz/aurea-ensemble-presents-a-concert-celebrating-the-ideals-of-democracy-and-equality/ What happens when artists meet at the margins of their disciplines and push the boundaries back and forth? What happens is AUREA, a performance ensemble engaged in a joyful quest to investigate and reinvigorate the harmony of music and speech. Aurea set, one of New England’s most original and extraordinary chamber ensembles, presents its second […]]]>

What happens when artists meet at the margins of their disciplines and push the boundaries back and forth? What happens is AUREA, a performance ensemble engaged in a joyful quest to investigate and reinvigorate the harmony of music and speech.

Aurea set, one of New England’s most original and extraordinary chamber ensembles, presents its second concert of the season, I HEAR AMERICA SINGING, Saturday, September 24 at 8:00 p.m., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 50 Park Place , Pawtucket, RI. This concert will feature Aurea’s signature lineup, which immerses audiences in poetry and prose, unique harmonica improvisations and chamber music.

I HEAR AMERICA SINGING celebrates the ever-evolving ideals of democracy and simultaneously honors walt whitmannthe 2019 Bicentennial and the 2020 Centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. Along with selected passages of Whitman’s groundbreaking poetry and prose, this performance includes lyrics by Langston Hughesinterspersed with music by Dvorak, Amy Beach, Aaron Copland, george walkerCharles Ives, Florence Prizeand a recent chamber opera by contemporary composer Francine Trester.

The first half of the program draws on Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and other writings that reflect his eclectic musical sensibility and vision of American democracy in the face of Civil War. The second half develops Whitman’s aesthetic and democratic vision and also illuminates Florence Prize‘s life and music (1888-1953), featuring some of his music for string quartet. Price was the first black composer in America to have a symphony performed by a major American orchestra and inspired Boston-based composer Francine Trester, whose twenty-minute chamber opera Florence Comes Home will also be performed. The piece, based on researched archives and the 2007 discovery of some of Price’s lost musical manuscripts and letters, won acclaim at its Boston premiere in fall 2019 and Rhode Island premiere by Aurea in 2020.

Consuelo Sherba, Artistic Director of Aurea, said, “We have much to gain from listening to Whitman’s magnanimous fervor with fresh, critical ears. In light of Whitman’s recent bicentennial, expansive vision, and impact on American culture, we are also acutely aware of how much more encompassing that vision can be.” She continued, “The revelations of a set beautiful works recently discovered by the African-American composer of the early 20th century, Florence Prize, are particularly poignant in light of the 2020 centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment. After the program’s inspiring arc, it is very gratifying to conclude with contemporary Boston composer Francine Trester’s lyrical tribute to Price.”

About the Aurea Ensemble

Based in Rhode Island and founded over 15 years ago, this eclectic chamber ensemble explores the relationship between music and speech. The group takes its name from Catena Aurea Homeri, or Homer’s Golden Chain, a symbol of 18th century esoteric alchemy – the combination of disparate elements into a new divine element. This is the very definition of every Aurea event: a new kind of artistic experience is created from the band’s solid framework of classical, folk and contemporary music performed with eloquent poetry, journals and prose.

Performers:

Brianna Robinson, soprano
Carrie Cheron, mezzo-soprano
RaShaun Campbell, baritone
Alexey Shabalin, violin
Anna Williams, violin
Consuelo Sherba, viola
Emmanuel Feldman, cello
Chris Turner, harmonica player/player
Nigel Gorereader

]]>
South Florida Classical Review » » The Miami Lyric Opera celebrates 20 years with a richly dramatic “Carmen” https://saturova.cz/south-florida-classical-review-the-miami-lyric-opera-celebrates-20-years-with-a-richly-dramatic-carmen/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 17:56:06 +0000 https://saturova.cz/south-florida-classical-review-the-miami-lyric-opera-celebrates-20-years-with-a-richly-dramatic-carmen/ Francesca Aguado holds the title role of Bizet Carmen at the Lyric Opera of Miami. The Miami Lyric Opera celebrates its 20th anniversarye anniversary this season, and on Saturday night, the robust company took the stage at the South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center with Georges Bizet Carmen. Bizet was convinced his opera was a failure […]]]>

Francesca Aguado holds the title role of Bizet Carmen at the Lyric Opera of Miami.

The Miami Lyric Opera celebrates its 20th anniversarye anniversary this season, and on Saturday night, the robust company took the stage at the South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center with Georges Bizet Carmen.

Bizet was convinced his opera was a failure after critical acclaim when it premiered in March 1875. CarmenPerhaps the libretto was too realistic in its depiction of popular life in Seville, perhaps too provocative in its musical exoticism, or perhaps too harsh in its refusal to reward virtue in the end.

What the libretto and music provide, however, is a tangible story of a strong, if sometimes manipulative, woman whose charms drive the men in her life mad. To take the deepest fall and ultimately take her life is Corporal Don José whose blinding love for Carmen can’t allow her to be with anyone else.

Bizet’s music flirts, soars and flirts like the characters in the story. Bizet died a few months after the premiere, unaware of the notoriety that his comical opera would win in the centuries to come.

MLO’s production featured a mix of young and more experienced singers. Soloists Philip Alongi as Don José and Francesca Aguado as Carmen shone in their roles with vocal prowess and stage presence. Their onstage chemistry was palpable and their musical dialogue was projected with a wonderful vocal blend.

The mezzo-soprano Aguado inhabited the character of Carmen with great ease from her first moments on stage with “Love is a rebellious bird”. His tone was dark and opulent, matching the seductive nature of the character. Aguado had an excellent understanding of Carmen’s temperamental nature, evident in her inflection of phrases and spin of ornate melodies. She did not hesitate to emphasize the lower and spoken part of her register, giving the performance more immediacy and intensity.

Tenor Alongi stood out throughout the performance. His assimilation of the emotional strain of the role laid the foundation for the character’s development. He was always precise with a sustained, powerful and rich tone. An engaging performer, Alongi drew audiences in with his falsetto voices as he convinced Carmen of his love and hooked them excitedly in the high, sustained notes. Its transparent, but sometimes desperate tone, recalls that of a tenor in the vein of Italian. verism. Alongi captured Don José’s inner struggle and provided a beautiful contrast of timbre, particularly in “The Flower You Thrown Me” (Act II) and the final scene.

In the roles of Micaëla and Escamillo were the soprano Nathalie Avila and the baritone Oscar Martinez. Avila’s tone was perhaps a little too forward for the sweet and naive Micaëla, but she showed good control of sentence nuance and believable characterization. Martinez, as a toreador, provided a solid stage presence, but his diction and melodic outline left much to be desired.

A well-prepared number was the smuggler quintet “We have a case in mind” from Act II, a moment in the plot where Carmen pushes Don José to choose between his love for her and his duty as a soldier. Aguado, joined by sopranos Elizabeth DiFronzo (Mercédès) and Samantha Riling-Lopez (Frasquita), tenor Rolando Valdez (Remendado) and baritone Gabriel Menendez (Dancaire) handled the fast passages and cheerful ensemble singing with conviction.

The MLO Orchestra, under the direction of long-time collaborator, conductor Jeffrey Eckstein, provided good support for the singers. Eckstein was deliberate in its conducting, though the orchestra repeated high-pitched entries and unclear articulation. Although enthusiastic, the chorus numbers often lacked quality and blend of tone, as well as timing.

A welcome addition to this production were two flamenco dancers Jose Junco and Cristina Masdueño, whose spotlighted numbers in the tavern and in front of the bullfighting ring provided a fresh and authentic vibe. They exuded liveliness and flair through the rhythmic inflections of castanets and heel steps. The well-matched duo reflected Carmen’s passionate but tortured relationships with her suitors.

The set design was a highlight of this sold-out performance with impressive sets by Stivanello/Somani and efficient lighting. The canvases, painted in great detail, created layers of Spanish architectural pieces with the mysterious mountain hideout from Act 3 adding dimensionality to the production.

Carmen will be repeated Sunday at 4 p.m. at the South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center. 20 of the Miami Lyric Operae The anniversary gala concert will take place on November 19. miamilyricopera.net.

Posted in Shows


leave a comment

]]>
Album Reviews: Sweden | Ozzy Osbourne | LeAnn Rimes | Sudan Archives https://saturova.cz/album-reviews-sweden-ozzy-osbourne-leann-rimes-sudan-archives/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 13:49:13 +0000 https://saturova.cz/album-reviews-sweden-ozzy-osbourne-leann-rimes-sudan-archives/ ICP Sweden: Dean Chalkley Daim: Autofiction (BMG) *** Ozzy Osbourne: Patient Number 9 (Columbia Records) *** LeAnn Rimes: God’s Handiwork (EverLe Records/Thirty Tigers) *** Sudan Archives: Natural Brown Prom Queen (Stones Throw) **** Thirty years ago, Sweden swagger in the spotlight, grabbed the zeitgeist by the throat and held their music press title as Britain’s […]]]>
ICP Sweden: Dean Chalkley

Daim: Autofiction (BMG) ***

Ozzy Osbourne: Patient Number 9 (Columbia Records) ***

LeAnn Rimes: God’s Handiwork (EverLe Records/Thirty Tigers) ***

Sudan Archives: Natural Brown Prom Queen (Stones Throw) ****

Thirty years ago, Sweden swagger in the spotlight, grabbed the zeitgeist by the throat and held their music press title as Britain’s best new band. Today, their muscular frontman Brett Anderson admits feeling his age.

Following a post-reform trilogy of what could rightly be described as mature comeback albums, Suede’s ninth missive is in part his response to feuds with his 50-somethings – a self-proclaimed “punk” album with their old fool Ed Buller back behind the production desk.

The autofiction is more polished than their back-to-basics description suggests, but the songs are certainly melodically direct and vigorous in delivery with Anderson going to hell for leather in this goodnight, drummer Simon Gilbert flexing his muscles as efficiently as ever and guitarist Richard Oakes unleashes a succession of gothic post-punk riffs in the Bauhaus/Banshees stadium.

Photo of Ozzy Osbourne: Ross Halfin

Debut single She Still Leads Me On is a catchy indie pop song with a decent dramatic chorus hook. The lyrics are inspired by Anderson’s late mother but this requiem is delivered with an aggressive spirit. Personality Disorder arrives over pounding drums and declamatory lyrics, before Anderson whispers “will you be my personality disorder?” It’s his midlife catharsis, still living dangerously to some extent pushing his voice in volume and pitch on the rockabilly route of The Boy on the Stage.

He gives himself a break on the smoother, expansive ballad Drive Myself Home and the roving It’s Always the Quiet Ones, but ramps up the melodrama on What Am I Without You. The zeitgeist has long moved on, but Suede continues to justify its revival with such powerful fare.

Ozzy Osbourne feels its age for about 50 years but the rock does not stop on its umpteenth album. Patient Number 9 rock’n’roll madness-themed riffs undermined theatrically by Alice Cooper but tackled more plaintively by Osbourne, whose expression of disorientation and choking on Nothing Feels Right has a more confessional tone and whose Darkside Blues has a haunted tone.

Osbourne teams up with a different metal guitarist for each song – Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready rips eagerly on Immortal, Zakk Wylde brings the fuzz and earth-shaking on Parasite, in which Ozzy imagines his mother’s ghost taunting , his Black Sabbath brother Tony Iommi serves up his usual near-classic inflections and meaty riffola and Eric Clapton ruminates on One of These Days.

LeAnn Rimes

Central peasant LeAnn Rimes is also in a collaborative mood on his latest album, drawing his guests from the soul, blues, jazz and pop worlds. Ziggy Marley and Ben Harper are guests on The Only’s lame reggae pop while Sheila E rocks a controlled racket on The Wild, with a polyphonic, tribal incantation backing a strong, soaring vocal. Something Better’s Coming features more choral elevation, with bluegrass seasoning, while the title track God’s Work sits at the intersection of country, gospel and pop. Rimes is at its strongest, however, on the sumptuous piano ballad Spaceship.

Los Angeles-based singer, rapper and violinist Brittney Denise Parks releases her second album as Sudan Archives in the same eclectic soul spirit as Lizzo. Natural Brown Prom Queen is a bold personal artistic statement, encompassing supple R&B with early ’80s electro inflections on Homemaker, the ravishing soul of Chevy S10 and Ciara’s woozy pop R&B. Parks is a bit more aloof than her diva contemporaries, but whether it’s infusing the title track with an African violin drone, celebrating black hairstyles on the eccentric electro pop number Selfish Soul or from incorporating unexpected Celtic fiddle samples into the psych funk rap track TDLY, she makes everything sound like a natural fit.

Haydn: Symphony No. 103 & Theresienmesse (CORO) ****

Harry Christophers’ relationship with the Handel and Haydn Society of Boston produced a series of refreshing recordings, particularly of Haydn’s music. As a group of period instruments and a sizable choir, pairings like this most recent – ​​Symphony No. 103 “Drum Roll” and the Theresienmesse – are intriguing possibilities. Christophers opens with the symphony, the scepter-like presence of the solo timpani inspiring a reading that progresses with soulful purity and precision. There’s a tiny flatness to the opening intonation, but in light of the sparkle that fills the final Minuet and Finale, it may be conscious, anticipated deliberation. The main course is the mass, a spectacle that fully captures its nobility and spiritual fervor. The chorus offers suitably restrained splendor, complemented by the well-matched solo quartet of Mary Bevan (soprano), Catherine Wyn-Rogers (mezzo soprano), Jeremy Budd (tenor) and Sumner Thompson (baritone). A well run outing. Ken Walton

Sam Reider: Petrichor (Slow and Steady Records) ****

Sam Reider, accordionist with jazz-bluegrass fusioners Human Hands, makes his solo piano debut with a very different genre of jazz, celebrating the return to his native San Francisco and the happy rediscovery of his grandfather’s 1918 Steinway. Influenced by both classical and contemporary influences and with something of an old-fashioned piano recital, Reider’s playing is richly expressive, whether pensive or bursting with spontaneous life. Petrichor denotes “the fresh smell of earth after the first rain” and the title track is merrily mercurial, dancing around a busy left hand. In contrast, Mirror Lake is a limpid impressionist shimmer (and yes, Debussy comes to mind), a single note continually echoing under reserve chords. Emahoy takes on a majestic touch of Gershwin-esque blues; the blues, too, pervades Panoramic Highway, while the unapologetic Kansas sentimentality and Land’s End’s magnificent conclusion indeed seem to evoke a homecoming. Jim Gilchrist

]]>
Canberra Symphony Orchestra announces 2023 season https://saturova.cz/canberra-symphony-orchestra-announces-2023-season/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 00:55:50 +0000 https://saturova.cz/canberra-symphony-orchestra-announces-2023-season/ The Canberra Symphony Orchestra has announced its 2023 programme, Chroma, a season of three concert series, woven through music with an intricate fascination with Australian colour, visual and landscape, followed by the annual CSO Prom. It presents five world premieres of pieces commissioned by the CSO, as well as 18 Australian works in its programme. […]]]>

The Canberra Symphony Orchestra has announced its 2023 programme, Chroma, a season of three concert series, woven through music with an intricate fascination with Australian colour, visual and landscape, followed by the annual CSO Prom. It presents five world premieres of pieces commissioned by the CSO, as well as 18 Australian works in its programme.

Jessica Cottis, conductor and artistic director of the Canberra Symphony Orchestra. Photo © Kaupo Kikkas

For her curation, conductor and artistic director Jessica Cottis is inspired by the poetic essays of Derek Jarman of the same name.

“In ChromaJarman moves masterfully and mercurially from the ancient to the contemporary, drawing on the work of great color theorists from Pliny to Wittgenstein and interweaving deeply personal reflections on the essence of life. With music ranging from classical to modern, our season 2023 follows a similar kaleidoscopic journey, centering on composers with a close connection and special affinity with color.

The Llewellyn Series programs “vivid orchestral colors on the main stage of Llewellyn Hall, inspired by landscape, visual art and philosophy”. His first concert, Fire & Shadowfeatures percussionist and APRA AMCOS Luminary Award winner Claire Edwardes in a showcase of pieces by Stravinsky, Beethoven and Australian composer Iain Grandage who carefully draw in and out of light and dark, under the direction of guest conductor Dane lam.

Llewellyn Two, Electric blue, is a highlight of the program, contrasting the composers’ personal experiences of the color blue through music. The world premiere of Australian composer and sound artist Miriama Young TYPES OF BLUE is an exciting and modern opening, followed by the lively orchestrations of synesthete Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov to the lyrical and lush writing of Alexander Scriabin, who charted his own highly eccentric system of color symbolism.

In his vision of the union between musical keys and color, Scriabin’s Piano Concerto in F sharp minor becomes a rich romantic dive into the blue, while the notorious orchestral and synaesthetic artist, Rimsky-Korsakov, rather felt E major as a dark blue; he has thus colored many of his pieces inspired by the sea, including the daring Scheherazade, op. 35 which depicts Middle Eastern folk tales of Thousand and one Night. Rather than provoking an argument over which key composer captures blue most effectively, Cottis’ programming brings out all of its nuances in dazzling detail, with the help of star performer Sine Winther on the piano.

Kirsten Williams

Principal Violin of the CSO, Kirsten Williams. Photo © Martin Olman

Alexander Briger conducts Llewellyn Three, winter dreamswhich includes Erich Korngold Der Schneemann: Vorspiel, Serenade and Walzer, Annie Hui-Hsin Hsieh Frozen Disintegrationthe Concerto for seven wind instruments, percussion and strings by Frank Martin and Symphony No. 1 in G minor by Tchaikovsky, his own ‘winter dreams. The concert features CSO principals and CSO concertmaster Kirsten Williams.

Llewellyn Four, live greenis a parallel expedition to Electric blue drawing “the colors and contours of the natural world” through a lush sonic imagination of green forests. It comprises by Dvorak In the realm of nature, by Strauss Last four songsand Symphony No. 7 and Karelia Suite, Op. 11. It also premieres emerging composer Louisa Trewartha”…and the spirits of the woods weave magical secrets…” which balances the natural landscape with the mystical fantasy of the forest.

His Chamber Classics are divided into four parts that each reflect the nuance and richness of timbral and visual tone alongside the “vitality” of human experience of the world around us that Cotti highlights.

Connor D’Netto makes his debut as a composer in connection with the CSO with the world premiere of his commission in Watercolorsin layers between Fauré Ballad, op. 19 and Debussy’s Sonata in G minor, Ariettes Forgotten and Fêtes Galantes; a concert with soprano Chloe Lankshear. Additionally, Sally Greenaway’s CSO 2021 order for four basses, The sky is also yoursfind a feature on the night vision program. darkness to light presents Clara Schumann’s and Dvořák’s individual piano trios in G minor as key affirmations of how only darkness can reveal perceptions of light, while Everything that shines illustrates how gold and shimmer enhance color with Beethoven’s Trio in B flat major, Op. 11, at Jacques Ibert Three short pieces, and Wind Sextet in C Minor by Louise Farrenc, Op. 4 – all the pieces that underline the delicate sophistication of the wind family.

Connor D'Netto

Connor D’Netto is the Canberra Symphony Orchestra‘s Connecting Composer for 2023. Photo © Photography 10

Chroma showcases Australian music and voices in its Australian series, and highlights the importance and beauty found at home in the national music landscape. red desert sand is a shining gem in this series. William Barton joins the Canberra Symphony Orchestra as a featured performer, appearing in his own improvisational work for didgeridoo, voice and string quartet, Square circles under the red desert sand – a lively and evocative work from which the concert borrows its title. Prominent sound artist Ros Bandt’s Red, an ABC Classic order for electrified steel, is then followed by String Quartet No. 7, red landscape, by Peter Sculthorpe, which sonically recreates the arid, sunny desert landscape painted by his friend and collaborator, the painter Russell Drysdale. Katy Abbott’s vibraphone and cello duo, re-echo, is inspired by one of his earlier works, before a thrilling untitled premiere from Noongar fiddler Aaron Wyatt.

close to the air presents the Australian premiere of the 50-minute work by Simon James Phillips Perto Do Ar at the National Museum of Australia; a daring piece where the actors move around the audience and the performance space to swallow them up in the performance.

The last concert of this series, Game of light, offers a sumptuous collection of admired Australian artistic voices. Andrew Ford, Paul Stanhope, Connor D’Netto, Kate Moore and Lisa Illean color this concert with a subtle complexity, spaciousness and skilful lightness, while Yuwaalaraay composer Nardi Simpson demonstrates what light compels us to see and hear in a world-first commission.

CSO’s enigmatic season ends with the summer ball, the 2023 iteration of its annual community favorite. Led by Jessica Cottis and long-awaited following its cancellation in 2021, December’s family concert spans the lawns of Government House as the sun sets.

“Like many great works of visual art, these programs are shaped by the colors and contours of the natural world, from the deepest greens of Sibelius’ northern forests to the dizzying vastness of the red desert on our own continent,” says Cottis, reflecting on a season that spans from contemporary art music to striking classical works, moving from light to dark and day to night. “We certainly look forward to sharing these inspiring, vibrant and colorful works with all of you.”

Contribute to Limelight and support independent arts journalism.
]]>