Opera Singers – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:02:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saturova.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-1-150x150.png Opera Singers – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ 32 32 West Australian Opera announces 2023 season https://saturova.cz/west-australian-opera-announces-2023-season/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:02:45 +0000 https://saturova.cz/west-australian-opera-announces-2023-season/ at Bizet Carmenstaged on the hallowed turf of WACA, Sondheim’s magical musical In the woodsa new production of Bohemian and the world premiere of a work by composer WA Lachlan Skipworth will be among the works for West Australian Opera’s 2023 season. On top of that comes exciting news that in 2024 he will stage […]]]>

at Bizet Carmenstaged on the hallowed turf of WACA, Sondheim’s magical musical In the woodsa new production of Bohemian and the world premiere of a work by composer WA Lachlan Skipworth will be among the works for West Australian Opera’s 2023 season.

On top of that comes exciting news that in 2024 he will stage a new work commissioned from Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse titled Wundig wer Wilura. Performed in the Noongar language, it follows the success of their first opera Koolbardi wer Wardongwhich received a five-star review from limelight when it premieres in October 2021.

Into the Woods, Opera House of Northern Ireland, 2022. Photo © Steffan Hill

“Australian talent is at the fore in everything we do and we are particularly pleased to see singers from Western Australia take to the stage in lead roles,” said the company’s artistic director, Chris van Tuinen. “Our artists, including conductors, directors, designers, singers and musicians, are at the heart of this season, reminding us that this part of the world has something special.”

The season begins with the famous opera by Bizet Carmen, presented in association with the Perth Festival, which was originally scheduled for February this year but had to be delayed due to COVID restrictions. The large-scale outdoor show will be presented on a specially designed stage in the famous WACA ground, which will be animated by projections. Directed by Stuart Maunder and directed by Dane Lam, it will feature over 150 singers and musicians, with rising star Ashlyn Tymms making her debut as Carmen.

In March, WA Opera presents Stephen Sondheim’s 1986 musical In the woods. The production was directed by Cameron Menzies for the Northern Ireland Opera, of which he is artistic director. Inaugurated in February this year, it was critically acclaimed.

Irish news described it as “an exciting, moving and entertaining evening of musical theatre”. In a four-star review, The temperature said, “Cameron Menzies’ output comes with such irresistible zest and unwavering energy that it has earned packed houses throughout its run.” In another four star review, The Sunday Times described it as an “outrageously stylish revival”.

The production will be directed by Jen Winley and will star Maria Mercedes as The Witch and Samantha Clarke as The Baker’s Wife.

In April, the company will present Bach’s Easter Oratorio in association with the UWA Conservatory of Music. Featuring the UWA Symphony Choir and the UWA Symphony Choir with WAO’s Wesfarmers Arts Young Artists, it will be conducted by van Tuinen and conducted by Margrete Helgeby Chaney. Composer WA Lachlan Skipworth has been commissioned to write a new work, “responsive and interlocking with the Bach”, to be performed alongside the oratorio.

In July, WAO will stage Verdi’s fine Opera Australia production otellooriginally directed by Harry Kupfer in 2003. Review of an OA revival for limelight in 2014, Clive Paget said, “Hans Schavernoch’s setting with its dramatically dramatic and potentially perilous steps, reflects the decaying Empire with bomb craters, providing excellent hidden spots for an Iago or Otello.” Paul O’Neill will play the title role, with van Tuinen on the podium.

The 2023 season ends in October with Puccini’s Bohemian, in a new co-production between WAO and Opera Queensland. Directed by Matt Reuben James Ward and directed by van Tuinen, the production stars Elena Perroni as Mimì and Paul O’Neill as Rodolfo.

Gina Williams Koolbardi with Wardong

Gina Williams as Ngaank Boodja during rehearsals for Koolbardi wer Wardong. Photo © James Rogers

The new opera by Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse Wundig wer Wilura will be staged in 2024. Reviewing their first opera Koolbardi were Wardongwhich told the traditional Noongar story of Koolbardi the magpie and Wardong the crow, limelight said: “Sung in the Noongar language with supertitles, composers Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse have created a melodious and engaging hour-long score for the young cast, with jazzy rhythms mingling with the strings and winds of the orchestra, skillfully orchestrated by Chris Stone.”

Summarizing the season, WAO Executive Director Carolyn Chard said, “Our dream is to speak to the heart through the human voice. We share the joy of music through opera and the powerful stories opera tells. We are unique and proud of Western Australia and bring audiences and performers together to celebrate sung stories that are relevant to our people, times and places.


Subscriptions are available starting at 9 a.m. AWST on November 24. General tickets go on sale at 9:00 a.m. on December 1. More information can be found here.

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MUSE Academy announces a series of invited guest artists https://saturova.cz/muse-academy-announces-a-series-of-invited-guest-artists/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://saturova.cz/muse-academy-announces-a-series-of-invited-guest-artists/ MUSE Guest Artist Series Guests include award-winning musicians, poets, opera singers, blues legends and actresses to engage with students We are thrilled that so many artists who are at the top of their respective fields have agreed to come and generously share their life experiences and craftsmanship with MUSE students. —Anne Glass BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, […]]]>

MUSE Guest Artist Series

Guests include award-winning musicians, poets, opera singers, blues legends and actresses to engage with students

We are thrilled that so many artists who are at the top of their respective fields have agreed to come and generously share their life experiences and craftsmanship with MUSE students.

—Anne Glass

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, USA, Nov. 21, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — MUSE Academy, an independent school in the heart of Brooklyn’s arts district that offers exceptional academics combined with music, dance, arts and foreign languages ​​on a daily basis, today announced the launch of the MUSE Guest Artist Series.

During this inaugural year, a number of acclaimed artists will visit the school to share their personal stories and describe the life of an artist to the children of MUSE in an intimate and creative setting.

“We are thrilled that so many artists who are at the top of their respective fields have agreed to come generously share their life experiences and create with MUSE students and offer a window into their creative process in an intimate setting” , said Anne Glass. , director of the school of the MUSE Academy.

These guest artist series will be captured on video and made available as highlight reels on the MUSE YouTube channel.

Paul Muldoon is an Irish poet and professor of poetry at Princeton University and former professor at Oxford University. Professor Muldoon is the recipient of prestigious awards such as the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and the TS Eliot Prize. Professor Muldoon will visit MUSE Academy to speak to our students on November 22, 2022. To learn more about Paul Muldoon and his work, you can visit his website here: https://www.paulmuldoonpoetry.com/about-paul-muldoon

Terry Abrahamson is a Grammy Award-winning blues musician and songwriter. Abrahamson has collaborated with other blues giants such as Muddy Waters, and his music has been recorded or performed by artists such as Prince, Johnny Winter and the Chambers Brothers. Terry Abrahamson is inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, and his latest book, “In the Belly of the Blues,” aims to present an authentic history of the Blues to children. To learn more about Terry Abrahamson, his music and his engaging presentations, visit: https://www.inthebellyoftheblues.com

Maya Beiser is an award-winning avant-garde cellist, producer and multifaceted artist. Raised in the mountains of Galilee in Israel by her Argentinian father and French mother, Maya spent her youth surrounded by the music and rituals of Jews, Muslims and Christians, while studying the classical cello repertoire. At the age of 12, she was discovered by the late violinist Isaac Stern who became her mentor throughout her early career. His recent albums Bowie Cello Symphonic: Blackstar (2020), delugEON (2019), Tranceclassical (2016), Uncovered (2014) and Provenance (2012), topped the classical music charts. To learn more about May and her music, visit:
https://www.mayabeiser.com

Anthony Roth Costanzo is internationally recognized as a countertenor, producer and curator. Recently, Costanzo sang the title role in Akhnaton with the Metropolitan Opera, which also won the 2022 Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording. He has won acclaim for his appearances on stages including Carnegie Hall, Houston Grand Opera, Teatro Real Madrid, Glimmerglass Festival, Finnish National Opera and Lyric Opera of Chicago. To listen to the work of Anthony Roth Costanzo and learn more about his exciting career, visit: https://anthonyrothcostanzo.com

Mary Louise Parker is an acclaimed stage and film actress whose work has been recognized by the industry’s highest accolades, including a Tony Award, Emmy Award, and multiple Golden Globe Awards. Among the many notable film roles, she played Grand Canyon (1991), Fried Green Tomatoes (1991), The Client (1994), Bullets over Broadway (1994), A Place for Annie (1994), Boys on the Side ( 1995), The Portrait of a Lady (1996) and The Creator (1997). She also starred in the television series Weeds, which ran for eight seasons on Showtime and won numerous awards, including a Golden Globe for lead actress.

“The MUSE approach to learning centers on creativity, collaboration, and the joy of learning and artistic expression. Each of these artists is known for breaking down barriers to recreate existing art forms and expand how we conceive of different genres and traditions,” said Crocker Coulson, Founder and Chairman of the Board of MUSE. “We are honored that they have agreed to come and spend their time with our children and we expect these will be experiences our students will never forget.”

About MUSE Academy

MUSE Academy is an independent school in Brooklyn, addressing a critical need for high quality humanistic education. We seek to develop each child’s full potential as lifelong learners, expressive artists and active citizens in their community. Music, movement, visual arts and performance are central to the MUSE educational experience and contribute profoundly to cognitive and social development. Our unique preschool and kindergarten programs nurture creativity and a passion for learning from an early age. MUSE Academy has a diverse, warm and welcoming community of families, students and faculty.

Crocker Coulson
MUSE Academy
+1 646-652-7185
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
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Dessoff Choirs Announces Holiday Concert Series, December 2-11 https://saturova.cz/dessoff-choirs-announces-holiday-concert-series-december-2-11/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 03:03:15 +0000 https://saturova.cz/dessoff-choirs-announces-holiday-concert-series-december-2-11/ The Dessoff Choir today announced their annual holiday concert series. Now in its 98th year, The Dessoff Choirs continues to lead audiences into the holiday spirit with three performances at some of New York’s finest churches. This season’s offerings include the popular choir sing-along of Handel’s Messiah followed by a pair of concerts featuring Christmas […]]]>

The Dessoff Choir today announced their annual holiday concert series. Now in its 98th year, The Dessoff Choirs continues to lead audiences into the holiday spirit with three performances at some of New York’s finest churches. This season’s offerings include the popular choir sing-along of Handel’s Messiah followed by a pair of concerts featuring Christmas carols and season favourites.

The holiday season kicks off with what has become an annual tradition for singers across New York City: the annual singing of Handel’s Messiah at Harlem’s Union Theological Seminary. The 40+ member The Dessoff Choirs will be joined by audience members of all ages and singing abilities. “One of the highlights of our season is singing ‘Hallelujah!’ side by side with our neighbors,” says Malcolm J. Merriweather, Dessoff’s ninth musical director. “It doesn’t get more festive and warmer than that!” The following weekend, Dessoff performed a pair of Welcome Yule! concerts celebrating Mother and Child, the miracle of childbirth, and Mary in her universal aspect as mother of all the Prophets and co-redemptrix with Christ. John Tavener’s Mother and Child (2022) will accompany dishes by standard holiday and contemporary arrangements of classics, including a candlelit rendition of Silent Night.

The Dessoff Choirs, one of New York’s premier choirs, is an independent choir with an established reputation for pioneering interpretations of choral works from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Since its founding in 1924, Dessoff’s concerts, professional collaborations, community outreach and educational initiatives have aimed to stimulate public interest and appreciation for choral music as an art form that enhances culture and the life of our time. With a repertoire spanning a wide variety of eras and styles, Dessoff’s musical insight and flexibility have been recognized with invitations from major orchestras for oratorios and orchestral works. Past performances include Britten’s War Requiem and Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 with Lorin Maazel in his final performances as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic.

Over its nearly 100-year history, Dessoff has presented many world premieres, including works by Virgil Thomson, George Perle, Paul Moravec and Ricky Ian Gordon; the first American performance in nearly 100 years of Montemezzi’s La Nave with the Teatro Grattacielo; and the American premieres of Philip Glass’ Symphony No. 5 and Sir John Tavener’s Night’s Vigil, The Veil of the Temple.

Dessoff’s recent discography includes Margaret Bonds: THE BALLAD OF THE BROWN KING AND SELECTED SONGS, an early recording of Margaret Bonds’ coronation, which was cited as “Best Classical Recording of 2019” by WQXR-FM Radio; REFLECTIONS, with music by Convery, Corigliano, Moravec and Rorem; and GLORIES ON GLORIES, a collection of American songs featuring composers from Billings to Ives. The Dessoff Choirs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by funds from the New York State Council of the Arts with support from the Bureau of the Governor and the New York State Legislature. Please visit dessoff.org for more information.

Conductor and baritone Malcolm J. Merriweather leads a versatile career with performances ranging from songs by Margaret Bonds to gems of the symphonic choral repertoire. The baritone can be heard on the GRAMMY nominated recording of Paul Moravec’s Sanctuary Road (NAXOS). Hailed by Opera News as “moving…expertly performed”, Margaret Bonds: The Ballad of the Brown King & Selected Songs (AVIE) has received tremendous praise worldwide.

He is Director of the New York Philharmonic Chorus and Music Director of the Dessoff Choirs of New York, known for their interpretations of great choral works from the pre-Baroque era through the 21st century. Associate Professor, Director of Choral Studies and Coordinator of the Vocal Department at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, he also joined the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music. He was the founding artistic director of “Voices of Haiti”, a 60-member children’s choir in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, run by the Andrea Bocelli Foundation.

Maestro Merriweather’s 2022-2023 year began with conducting the Trinity Wall Street Choir in three (staged) performances of Considering Matthew Shepard. In his new appointment as director of the New York Philharmonic Chorus, he prepares the professional chorus for three programs throughout the season for Maestro Jaap van Zweden, including Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony for the reopening of David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center . With the Dessoff Choir, he conducts Duruflé’s Requiem, Bach’s Saint John Passion and the motets of Vicente Lusitano, the first published black composer. This season includes the long-awaited release of the debut recording of Margaret Bonds’ Creed and Simon Bore the Cross with the AVIE label. His solo baritone engagements include Messiah at Carnegie Hall; Sanctuary Road with the Cincinnati May Festival and the Penn Square Music Festival.

Merriweather holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Conducting from Kent Tritle’s studio at the Manhattan School of Music, where her doctoral dissertation “Now I walk in Beauty, Gregg Smith: A Biography and Complete Works Catalog” was compiled the first complete list of works. for the composer and conductor. He earned a Master of Music in Choral Conducting and Vocal Performance from Rita Shane’s studio at the Eastman School of Music, as well as a Bachelor of Music in Music Education from Syracuse University, summa cum laude. His professional affiliations include membership in Pi Kappa Lambda, the American Choral Directors Association and Chorus America. Connect with him on Twitter and Instagram @maestroweather.

Program details:

COVID policy: Proof of vaccination and mandatory masks.

Tickets: All concert tickets can be purchased by visiting dessoff.org.

THE MESSIAH SINGS!

Friday, December 2, 2022 at 7:30 p.m.

Union Theological Seminary, 3041 Broadway @ 121st Street, Manhattan

Tickets: $17.50

Program:
Messiah

George Friderick Handel (1685-1759)

WELCOME YULE: MOTHER AND CHILD
Friday, December 9, 2022 at 7:30 p.m. St. Paul the Apostle, 405 West 59th Street, Manhattan
Sunday, December 11, 2022 at 4 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 199 Carroll Street @ Clinton Street, BrooklynTickets: $35 General, $24 Seniors/Students
Program: Carol: Oh come all faithful John Francis Wade (1711-1786) arr. David Willcocks (born 1919-2015)
Verbum Caro factus est Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612)
Loquebantur Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)
Regina Caelli Vicente Lusitano (1520-1561)
Carol: Hear the Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) arr. Daniel Fortune
CoventryCaro Gregg Smith (1931-2016)
Go Tell It On The Mountain Evelyn Simpson-Curenton (b. 1953)
Mother and Child (2002) John Tavener (1944-2013)
Song: Silent Night Franz Xaver Gruber (1787-1863)
Hallelujah of the Messiah George Friderick Handel (1685-1759)

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Dr. Anne Morgan | obituary https://saturova.cz/dr-anne-morgan-obituary/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 18:09:20 +0000 https://saturova.cz/dr-anne-morgan-obituary/ Dr. Anne Hodges Morgan, nationally acclaimed historian, author and expert on the formation and operation of family foundations, trusts and non-profit organizations, died Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at her Normandy home after a long illness. She was 82 years old. She was born March 1, 1940 to Jeddie and Velvon Hodges in Houston, Texas, spending […]]]>

Dr. Anne Hodges Morgan, nationally acclaimed historian, author and expert on the formation and operation of family foundations, trusts and non-profit organizations, died Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at her Normandy home after a long illness. She was 82 years old.

She was born March 1, 1940 to Jeddie and Velvon Hodges in Houston, Texas, spending her teenage years in Dallas. In 1962, the year she graduated from North Texas University, she won the international NBC talk show competition, the experience she credits with changing her life. Impressed by her outstanding performance, one of the debate television producers arranged a scholarship for her to pursue her master’s degree at Columbia University in New York.

After graduating, Anne went to Washington D.C., intending to become a diplomat, but her first job was managing congressional liaison at the Library of Congress while simultaneously working as a translator for the United Nations. This experience as a congressional researcher led him to become a legislative aide to US Senator John G. Tower of Texas.

In the late 1960s, she left Washington for the University of Texas at Austin where she earned her doctorate in American history in 1971, the year she married a popular young UT history professor, H. Wayne Morgan. The following year, Wayne began his 27-year career at the University of Oklahoma’s history department, the last six as president, Anne quickly became vice president of project development for the Kerr Foundation at Oklahoma City. His doctoral dissertation was a biography of US Senator from Oklahoma, Robert S. Kerr.

The Morgans enjoyed co-authoring and editing many books, mostly about Oklahoma and the Southwest; they traveled, interviewed and researched together; amassed a fine private art collection. They also supported all of OU’s other fine arts, including their close friend, Marilyn Horne, and her master class for opera singers. Their love of entertainment has made their home a center of good food and lively conversation.

From 1978 to 1980, Anne served as grant writer and project coordinator for Oklahoma Image, which won the largest library grant in history from the National Endowment for the Humanities. She and Wayne traveled throughout the state to study the ethnic makeup and diverse heritage of the groups that make up Oklahoma’s population, particularly blacks, Native Americans, and European immigrants. Enlisting 10 other historians as co-authors and Wayne as editor, the project produced a 10-volume series, “Newcomers to a New Land.” With so much research remaining, Anne followed with “Oklahoma Memories” and later a history of domestic politics in the Kennedy administration, “Kennedy and Congress.”

With the skills she exhibited at the Kerr Foundation, Anne was soon sought after as a consultant to family foundations, trusts, and nonprofits across the country and to serve as a trustee for many large foundations, such as the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. , the Kirkpatrick Foundation, the Kirkpatrick Family Fund, the Linda Pace Foundation and the Oklahoma City Community Foundation. She also served as chair of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education and served as governor of the Oklahoma State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Board of Vocational Education and Technical of Oklahoma State and the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Anne had the unique ability, coupled with a quick, irreverent wit and a lively sense of humor, to bring the right people together to implement programs to benefit the population at large, such as the Harn Homestead in Oklahoma City. , and any philanthropic project that would improve the state library system.

She was predeceased by her husband of 42 years, Dr. H. Wayne Morgan; his parents, Jeddie and Velvon Hodges; his sister, Sandra Hodges Gamal, and his brother-in-law, Dr. Saad Gamal. Survivors include two nephews, Sherif Gamal of Arlington, Virginia, and Hazem Gamal and his wife, Elizabeth, of West Orange, New Jersey. The family would like to thank Kelly Copeland for her many years of friendship and devoted care for Anne.

A funeral service will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday afternoon, December 8, 2022 at St. John’s Episcopal Church, 234 W. Duffy St, Norman, Oklahoma, followed by a reception.

The family has designated the Anne Hodges and H. Wayne Morgan Scholarship Fund at the University of Oklahoma Foundation, 100 Timberdell Road, Norman, OK 73072 as appropriate for Anne’s memorabilia.

Arrangements for Anne have been entrusted to Havenbrook Funeral Home in Norman. Online condolences can be shared at www.havenbrookfuneralhome.com.

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Britten Pears Arts unveils January to May 2023 season https://saturova.cz/britten-pears-arts-unveils-january-to-may-2023-season/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:11:08 +0000 https://saturova.cz/britten-pears-arts-unveils-january-to-may-2023-season/ Britten Pears Arts has announced its lineup for the coming months. The company will present a wide range of musical activities, including fan-favorite operas as well as new operas, premieres, headliners, orchestral concerts, educational programs, and more. This article will only feature voice-related events. From January to April, the Britten Pears Young Artist program will […]]]>

Britten Pears Arts has announced its lineup for the coming months. The company will present a wide range of musical activities, including fan-favorite operas as well as new operas, premieres, headliners, orchestral concerts, educational programs, and more.

This article will only feature voice-related events.

From January to April, the Britten Pears Young Artist program will feature Friday noon concerts. All concerts take place at Aldeburgh Jubilee Hall and will feature different types of classical programs.

Performance date: January 6 – April 28, 2023

Members of the Jubilee Opera will present a new adaptation of John Gay “The Beggar’s Opera” at Britten Studio from 6 p.m.

Performance date: March 12, 2023

by Bill Barclay “Knight” made its UK premiere with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. The event takes place at Snape Maltings Concert Hall starting at 7 p.m.

Performance date: March 19, 2023

This will be followed by works by JS Bach, Handel, Elena Langer’s ‘Love and Endings’ and the premiere of Michael Berkeley’s ‘Insects’, a piece commissioned by Britten Pears Arts written for harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani. Soprano Anna Dennis, Esfahani and oboist Nicholas Daniel take the stage at Britten Studio at 7:30 p.m.

Performance date: April 7 & 8, 2023

Bach’s Saint Matthew Passion will be performed from memory by Solomon’s Knot, an “international and flexible collective of singers and unconducted instrumentalists”. There will be nine singers, 26 instrumentalists and no conductor in attendance at Snape Maltings Concert Hall. The Easter Sunday concert starts at 4 p.m.

Performance date: April 9, 2023

Tenebrae brings a collection of Bach motets, including Singet dem Herrn, plus sacred vocal music by Sir James MacMillan to Snape Maltings Concert Hall at 7.30pm.

Performance date: May 27, 2023

The English Touring (ETO) in partnership with the Old Street Band will present three operas with period instruments. The first is that of Handel Jules Cesar. Sergey Rybin will conduct James Conway’s 2017 version at Snape Maltings Concert Hall. The show starts at 7:30 p.m.

Performance date: April 20, 2023

The next step is the new production of Eloise Lally de Donizetti Lucrezia Borgia led by ETO Music Director, Gerry Cornelius. The performance will also take place at Snape Maltings Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m.

Performance date: April 21, 2023

Finally, Valentina Ceschi will direct a new production of Rossini Viaggio in Reims directed by Jonathan Peter Kenny. This production also takes place at Snape Maltings Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m.

Performance date: April 22, 2023

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Opera Australia 2022 review: Attila https://saturova.cz/opera-australia-2022-review-attila/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 05:16:56 +0000 https://saturova.cz/opera-australia-2022-review-attila/ Photo credit: Prudence Upton Verdi’s ‘Attila’ from 1846 could be called ‘cabelettismo’, referring to the quantity it contains of those lively, strumming and decisive passages (‘cabaletti’) which crowned the vocal numbers of early Italian opera. of the 19th century. There could be an implication here that the 32-year-old Verdi leaned a bit too heavily on […]]]>

Photo credit: Prudence Upton

Verdi’s ‘Attila’ from 1846 could be called ‘cabelettismo’, referring to the quantity it contains of those lively, strumming and decisive passages (‘cabaletti’) which crowned the vocal numbers of early Italian opera. of the 19th century. There could be an implication here that the 32-year-old Verdi leaned a bit too heavily on this device, and that this prevalence limited the effectiveness of his drama.

But is this really the case?

I thought about it on October 29 while watching Opera Australia’s latest production at the Sydney Opera House, co-pro with Teatro Alla Scala, of this first work by Verdi which took two years to arrive on Australian shores. (thanks to COVID), and marveled at how captivating this production was.

The ancient story of Hunnish King Attila’s incomplete conquest of Italy and his murder at the hands of the leading lady Odabella at the end of the opera inspired a patriotic reaction when it was first performed in 1846. Some commentators contemporaries described this work as “a political education for the people.” Davide Livermore’s production, prepared for Sydney by Kate Gaul, showed how galvanizing this work could have been at the time. And maybe still.

Fascist Italy

Updated the original setting from the middle of the 5e century to Fascist Italy was perhaps an obvious way to ensure relevance closer to our times, but in fact, the sets of Giò Forma (ruins in the prologue) eerily evoked images of bombed-out ruins in Ukraine. It was a production that clearly depicted a dark story and conveyed its continued gravity.

In the opening scene, Attila’s forces invaded the Adriatic city of Aquileia, and Attila’s depictions of the summary executions of civilians had an immediacy that said “opera can also be a vital theater today “. In the second scene of the Prologue, one could be moved by the reconstruction of the refugee church and the redesign of a crude cross. It was a beautiful image of a new beginning, made poignant by the tender praises of the choir basses to the Lord (“Lode il Signor!”).

Incidentally, the only jarring note in the update to my ears was the banquet scene in the second scene of act two. Verdi’s original accompaniment – ​​a prominent harp – doesn’t quite justify the level of rejoicing and corruption the production might have hoped to convey.

Video projections are a familiar feature of recent Opera Australia productions. Look back to Livermore’s ‘Aida’ presented at the Sydney Opera House in 2020 and Graeme Murphy’s ‘Madam Butterfly’ earlier this year. The screenings once again added an extra dimension to this production.

In the Refugee Scene (Prologue, Scene Two), following a storm, ubiquitous black-and-white images of angry clouds augmented Verdi’s rudimentary beginning at the start of the 19e century tone painting. Perhaps most effectively the graphic depiction of Attila’s execution of the child’s father Odabella helped endear a character Charles Osborne described in his book on Verdi’s operas as “the most obnoxious heroine of all.” the Verdian opera”.

Yes, there is probably a question of how ubiquitous these digital projections should be in opera theater. The answer could be “a lot” in this cinematic age. But are they a new narrative or contrapuntal thread? Maybe a garnish? Some might consider them a distraction. I had hoped the footage would have provided an even more touching backstory at the end when Odabella is about to exact revenge; that we had seen her and her murdered father in visual references to even earlier days that we fondly remember.

And the singers?

But what of the singers, considering how Verdi, in a letter to one of his librettists, Piave, praised the opera’s “three prodigious characters.” The Opera Australia production boasts a compelling cast.

Baritone Michael Honeyman replaced an indisposed Mario Cassi as Ezio, Attila’s “honorable adversary”. Each of his scenes with Attila was an intense two-handed game, especially when he suggested that he and Attila should divide the world between them.

As Odabella, Armenian-Australian soprano Natalie Aroyan dominated the stage from the incredible two-octave fanfare of her entrance on ‘Santo di patria’, and she managed to make Odabella likeable in ‘Oh! nel fuggento nuvolo’ (see the image of his late father in fleeting clouds).

There was an engaging complexity to Ukrainian-born baritone Taras Berezhansky’s portrayal of the title role of Attila, particularly in the growing anxiety of his act two scene one telling Uldino (Virgilio Marino) of his dream – the disturbing vision of an old man who blocks his way to Rome.

Although he is not one of the “prodigious” characters mentioned by Verdi in his letter to Piave, Foresto is the main tenor, one of the Aquilean refugees, in love with Odabella. From entering the second scene to the prologue, Mexican-Australian tenor Diego Torre impressed with the clarity and precision of his sound. He provided one of the most effective moments of tenderness in this “educational” opera in his third-act aria “Che non avrebbe il misero”, caressing the word “angeli” (“because you are the equal of angels “) in his memories of Odabella.

In a supporting role, bass Richard Anderson conveyed great authority as Pope Leo, the old man of Attila’s dream, who stands up to the would-be conqueror and blocks Attila’s ambitions when he presents himself in the flesh. and bones to stop Attila’s progress towards Rome.

Kudos to Paws on Film and their horse wrestler who kept Pope Leo’s white horse calm during the rousing and almost overwhelming climax of the first act.

Conductor Andrea Battistoni provided a quick and seductively effective reading of this score. His careful attention to exciting and sometimes slightly dizzying tempo changes generated a lot of excitement. These cabalettas mentioned above were thrilling in his hands and those of the singers.

Arguably, this early Verdi opera lacks the extractable numbers you might find in a ‘Nabucco’ or ‘Macbeth’, although early Italian audiences latched onto the implicit patriotic appeal of ‘È gettata la mie sort” from Ezio (My fate is cast; I am ready for war). But Livermore, Gaul and Battistoni proved that “Attila” deserved to be appreciated as an impressive play. Baritone Berezhansky’s unfurling of a Ukrainian flag during the curtain call inspired a justified increase in the volume of opening night applause.

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The Yeomen of the Guard (English National Opera) https://saturova.cz/the-yeomen-of-the-guard-english-national-opera/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 21:24:20 +0000 https://saturova.cz/the-yeomen-of-the-guard-english-national-opera/ The Yeomen of the Guard contains the best of Gilbert and Sullivan: a pair of cunning plots that intertwine to perfection, a sublime blend of comedy and pathos, and an earworm-filled score that marries bubbly wit with genuine emotional weight and dramatic. It’s not easy to pull off – the libretto, written in faux Elizabethan, […]]]>

The Yeomen of the Guard contains the best of Gilbert and Sullivan: a pair of cunning plots that intertwine to perfection, a sublime blend of comedy and pathos, and an earworm-filled score that marries bubbly wit with genuine emotional weight and dramatic. It’s not easy to pull off – the libretto, written in faux Elizabethan, doesn’t easily trip over the tongue – but in the right hands the situational humor is genuinely funny, while the flippant cruelty of its conclusion can make you cry. the public.

Alexandra Oomens as Elsie and Richard McCabe as Point in ENO’s The Yeomen of the Guard. All photos © Tristram Kenton

English National Opera‘s new production is a matter of chance. Jo Davies’ directing looks good, and its 1950s update is a good idea, albeit inconsistently conducted. Chris Hopkins leads a well-done narrative from the score, and the vocals are pretty decent. The acting, however, sometimes falters. It falls to Richard McCabe as heartbroken jester Jack Point to land the opera’s emotional body shots.

Gilbert set the action in the England of Elizabeth I, hence the faux-Tudor dialogue. Moving it to 1953 and the coronation of Elizabeth II is a fair enough idea, and the action begins promisingly with the opening interrupted by BBC News footage of rail strikes and Beefeaters performing their ceremonial duty at the official opening of Parliament (moreover it has changede). We are also told, in those familiar BBC tones of yesteryear, of the arrest of military hero Colonel Fairfax on charges of espionage (a change from the libretto where he is falsely accused of witchcraft).

Davies made many such changes to the text to avoid self-imposed anachronisms. Some work, some don’t. ‘Jester’ is virtually absent, replaced by ‘comic’; ‘master’ becomes ‘boss’; and “family fool” becomes “qualified fool” (although in 1953 the Commandant of the Tower of London would surely not employ a comedian, job title changed or not). And while it’s possible a man was hanged in the 1950s (the last man executed in England was in 1964), I’m pretty sure the UK government didn’t employ professional torturers (at least not officially). Still, most of that is forgivable, and the Brexit references in Point’s Patter Act II song raise a sad smile.

The Yeomen of the Guard

The Yeomen of the Guard at ENO.

Curiously, beyond the opening, there’s not much that evokes the 1950s, other than Anthony Ward’s rather elaborate costumes. It’s as if the director got her concept lighted and then immediately ran out of ideas on how it would light up the script. Worse still, Davies seems uncertain whether this is a serious opera or a musical theater piece. It is, of course, potentially both, but she never quite commits one way or the other. It leaves fleeting moments like the tap-dancing soldiers of the Queen’s Guard feeling out of whack (not to mention their annoying, totally unmotivated moves behind Colonel Fairfax as he sings Free from its sinister chains).

Otherwise, Kay Shepherd’s choreography has an old-fashioned, quaint quality to it – think Royal Variety Show c. 1950 – much of which works well. What’s missing is situational humor. Surely more of Phoebe’s fake seduction could have been done on Wilfred while her father steals the keys (here, oddly, needing a ladder to reach them).

Davies’ biggest misstep is putting on the trio of Ruddigore in Act II in place of the comic duo of Sergeant Meryll and Dame Carruthers Rapture, rapture. Executed as an unhinged quartet, the number not only needs most of its lyrics rewritten (and still has nothing to say in the context of the story), but it’s taken at such a labored tempo that the famous punchline – “that particularly fast, unintelligible crackle is usually not heard and if so, it doesn’t matter” – is rendered so intelligibly that it could be followed by a Dutchman.

Another problem is dialogue. Without pointing fingers, some singers struggle to deliver it comfortably or naturally. The result is a shrewd stillness and fatal lack of rhythm, especially in Act I, which tends to drag on. Act II is generally more effective, especially when the choreography clicks into place and picks up the musical numbers.

The Yeomen of the Guard

John Molloy as Shadbolt and Richard McCabe as Point.

Ward’s ensemble comes into its own in the second act as well. In Act I, the stage feels oddly expansive, especially for interior scenes, with only a distant view of the White Tower to place us. In Act II, the rotating 3D white tower takes center stage, while the nighttime backdrop of a looming Tower Bridge (opened in 1894) and misty skies create a mesmerizing atmosphere (the detailed lighting by Oliver Fenwick is excellent throughout). Add the everyday dark blue uniforms of the Yeomen Warders and the crisp 1950s hemlines of Dame Carruthers – here upgraded from housekeeper to deputy tower governor – and her cohort of female soldiers and the picture is so complete. convincing.

The singers range from excellent to adequate. Ironically, it’s McCabe, a man with an exceptionally unremarkable singing voice, who wins the laurels here. His Jack Point, sort of a cross between Max Miller and Tony Hancock, is wonderfully three-dimensional. By downplaying almost everything, and with some delicious ablibs, it not only comes across as hysterically funny, but also touching and vulnerable. His drunken reappearance at the end is an emotional punch.

Australian soprano Alexandra Oomens builds on her excellent Josephine last year HMS apron to create another well-sung and well-balanced character, even if she seems a little posh for a street performer. She certainly invests in Elsie’s dilemma and sings her heart out in It’s done, I’m a bride. She also has a real rapport with Point, which comes through in their convincingly acted out dialogue.

As Fairfax, Anthony Gregory’s bright, forward-thinking tenor could use a little more heat, but he deploys it elegantly enough and has some lovely hushed moments. Dramatically, Davies fails to deal with his cruel and selfish behavior, resulting in a game that sometimes feels disconnected from the text.

The Yeomen of the Guard

Susan Bickley as Dame Carruthers. Photo © Tristan Kenton

Heather Lowe’s rich mezzo is ideal for Phoebe, and she plays it with just the right amount of naive sensuality. She is also very adept at digging into the lyrics. A little more direction could refocus part of the arch and bring out a real woman who is unexpectedly going through her first experience of true heartache. As her potential lover, jailer Wilfred Shadbolt, John Molloy grows in stature as the evening progresses. His scenes and songs with Jack Point are the comedic heart of the series, with Here’s a rooster and bull story the most beautiful number of the night.

As Dame Carruthers, Susan Bickley musters all the pride and sternness necessary, singing with authority but without quite possessing the terrifying low notes for one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most pugnacious harridans. Neal Davies’ Sergeant Meryll is played softly, bringing out the sentimental side of the character. Vocally, he’s on top. Steven Page resembles the tower lieutenant with the stiff upper lip, although he can find more comedy in the man’s unimaginative and humorless side. Innocent Masuku and Isabelle Peters sing well in the small roles of Leonard Meryll and Kate.

In the pit, Chris Hopkins leads a detailed reading of Sullivan’s best score. His tempos are well judged and the whole thing has a thrust that propels the drama forward. There are, however, issues here and there coordinating tempos with the scene leading up to the oddly tattered moment. The ENO choir sings with energy and commitment, although the mix might take some work, especially the women. Strangely, the singers are amplified. Nick Lidster does a good job of balancing the vocals, although at times the orchestral sound can use lift.

English National Opera has struggled of late to maintain its artistic standards and prove its relevance. In recent days, Arts Council England (ACE) ended his vital core funding, offering a grant instead to help him move to Manchester. This uneven production somehow reflects the dilemma of which company could surely do better and which may have contributed to the downfall of the axe. Nonetheless, ACE’s short-sighted decision is bad news for the art form, and especially for operetta fans. If the company leaves town, I don’t see the Royal Opera House setting up G&S anytime soon.


The Yeomen of the Guard plays at the London Coliseum until December 2. More information here.

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Katherine Jenkins’ Duke of Edinburgh charity award is one of a kind https://saturova.cz/katherine-jenkins-duke-of-edinburgh-charity-award-is-one-of-a-kind/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:09:54 +0000 https://saturova.cz/katherine-jenkins-duke-of-edinburgh-charity-award-is-one-of-a-kind/ Katherine Jenkins is set to receive the first – and only – charity award approved by Queen Elizabeth II just before her death in memory of Her Majesty’s late husband, Prince Philip. The Welsh classical singer, 42, will receive the Variety Club Duke of Edinburgh Gold Heart award at the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards in […]]]>

Katherine Jenkins is set to receive the first – and only – charity award approved by Queen Elizabeth II just before her death in memory of Her Majesty’s late husband, Prince Philip.

The Welsh classical singer, 42, will receive the Variety Club Duke of Edinburgh Gold Heart award at the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards in London on November 21, Alison Boshoff of the Daily Mail has revealed.

Following Prince Philip’s death in 2021, Variety, the children’s charity, decided to award a special Gold Heart award in honor of the royal, who had supported the organization for more than 70 years.

“Charity chairman Professor Jonathan Shalit wrote to the Queen on August 1 – and received a reply on August 31 saying Her Majesty was delighted the award was given in memory of her husband. She died eight days later,” Alison wrote.

Katherine Jenkins (pictured on Tuesday) is set to receive the first – and only – charity award approved by Queen Elizabeth II just before her death in memory of Her Majesty’s late husband Prince Philip

The Welsh <a class=classical singer (pictured meeting the Queen in 2017) 42, will receive the Variety Club Duke of Edinburgh Gold Heart award at the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards in London on November 21, Daily Mail’s Alison Boshoff has revealed.” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

The Welsh classical singer (pictured meeting the Queen in 2017) 42, will receive the Variety Club Duke of Edinburgh Gold Heart award at the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards in London on November 21, Daily Mail’s Alison Boshoff has revealed.

Following Prince Philip's death in 2021, Variety, the Children's Charity, decided to award a special Gold Heart award in honor of the royal (pictured in 2007), who had supported the organization for more than 70 years.

Following Prince Philip’s death in 2021, Variety, the Children’s Charity, decided to award a special Gold Heart award in honor of the royal (pictured in 2007), who had supported the organization for more than 70 years.

Variety aims to change the lives of disabled and disadvantaged children in the UK. Professor Shalit said: “We are delighted and proud to be able to present this award.”

In September, Katherine said it was a “huge honour” to be asked to record the first version of the new national anthem, God Save the King.

The Welsh opera singer told Good Morning Britain hosts Susanna Reid and Ben Shepherd that she had in fact recorded something for the Queen after learning that Her Majesty had died aged 96 when she got the call.

“At first we stopped what we were doing. We had a moment of silence,” she said.

From a small church in a rural part of Sussex, Katherine was called by BBC Radio 4 asking them to shut down the World at One program with God Save the King.

Katherine, who was one of the Queen’s favorite singers and performed for the Royal Family on several occasions, said she had to “really think about” the lyrics, which have changed to reflect the new monarch, the King Charles III.

In September Katherine (pictured meeting the Queen in 2009) said it was a 'huge honour' to be asked to record the first version of the new national anthem, God Save the King.

In September Katherine (pictured meeting the Queen in 2009) said it was a ‘huge honour’ to be asked to record the first version of the new national anthem, God Save the King.

She said: “I really had to think about the future. Thinking about all the amazing things that have happened in the past with Her Majesty and her incredible reign.

‘But now think this way forward. I think King Charles will be a wonderful king so I wanted to do the words justice.

She described the recording as “a real moment” and “very emotional”, saying, “It was a real honor to be asked to do this.”

Katherine added that there were only five people in the church at the time, which made it an intimate moment.

Looking back on all the times she sang for the Queen, Katherine said the most memorable performance was her last, at the Platinum Jubilee celebrations in London in June 2022.

The beauty of the ball!  Katherine Jenkins stole the show in a stunning powder blue tulle dress as she joined Kate Silverton at the 10th Annual Tusk Conservation Awards in London on Tuesday.

The beauty of the ball! Katherine Jenkins stole the show in a stunning powder blue tulle dress as she joined Kate Silverton at the 10th Annual Tusk Conservation Awards in London on Tuesday.

She said, “I didn’t know it would be the last time I would sing for her.

“There was a really lovely moment where she was riding in the car and as she was leaving she came out near the stage and I wanted to curtsey to her and she gave me a little wave.”

Katherine added: “I think she was such an inspirational woman to so many of us in different ways.”

Speaking about his meetings with the new King Charles, Katherine, who has worked with the monarch on charity projects, said he “really cared” about the issues he was involved in.

“I think he will be a truly wonderful king. I have no doubts about that,” she said.

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Don’t miss concerts by flamenco dancers Choni and Marie Chain – Music and dance – Al-Ahram Weekly https://saturova.cz/dont-miss-concerts-by-flamenco-dancers-choni-and-marie-chain-music-and-dance-al-ahram-weekly/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 21:46:03 +0000 https://saturova.cz/dont-miss-concerts-by-flamenco-dancers-choni-and-marie-chain-music-and-dance-al-ahram-weekly/ The 31st Arab Music Festival and Conference (October 20-November 3) Arabic Music Institute 22 rue Ramsis, tel. 02 2574 3373 Thursday 3 p.m., 8 p.m.: Singers Taha Hussein, Ahmad Hassan, mohamed abdel hamid, Samah Abbas. Singer Ahmad Ibrahim gives a concert hosted by Omar Farahat. Cairo Opera House Gezira Exhibition Center, Tel 02 2737 0602/2736 […]]]>

The 31st Arab Music Festival and Conference (October 20-November 3)

Arabic Music Institute

22 rue Ramsis, tel. 02 2574 3373

Thursday 3 p.m., 8 p.m.: Singers Taha Hussein, Ahmad Hassan, mohamed abdel hamid, Samah Abbas. Singer Ahmad Ibrahim gives a concert hosted by Omar Farahat.

Cairo Opera House

Gezira Exhibition Center, Tel 02 2737 0602/2736 0361, ticket office 02 2739 0132/0144

fountain theater

Thursday 3 p.m., 8 p.m.: The closing ceremony of the festival features the Syrian superstar Assala in a concert conducted by maestro Mustafa Helmy.

ALEXANDRIA

Alexandria Opera House (Sayed Darwish Theatre)

Fouad Street, Mahatat Al-Raml, Alexandria, Tel 03/486 5106

Thursday 3 p.m., 8 p.m.: The Abdel-Halim Noweira Arab Music Ensemble

presents singers mohamed hassan, Amira Ahmed, Reem Hamdi and Mahmoud Abdel Hamid. Super star Ali El-Haggar gives a concert conducted by maestro Ahmad Amer.


Manial Palace

1 Al-Saraya St, Manial, Cairo, Tel 02 23687495

Manial Palace Festival (November 2-9)

The garden

Thursday 3 p.m., 8 p.m.: A special evening in the garden features a world-renowned mezzo soprano Farrah El Dibany in a concert in two parts, accompanied by the Cairo Opera Orchestraled by maestro Ahmed Farrag.

Fri 4 p.m., 8 p.m.: Flamenco and Spanish guitar concert Asuncion PerezChoni(dance/choreography), Victor Bravo (Dance), David Bastidas (singer), and Juanma Torres (guitar). The second part of the concert presents Choni and Egyptian-Canadian guitarist and oud player Ali Omar El-Farouk.

Wed 9, 8 p.m.: A concert with a world-renowned pianist Ramzi Yassamusical advisor and artistic director of the Manial Palace Festival, in collaboration with an international mezzo soprano El Hadidi Gala.


The 14the Annual Cairo Jazz Festival (October 27 – November 4)

This year’s exciting annual International Jazz Festival takes place at several venues on the AUC’s Tahrir Square campus. Among the highlights of this action-packed program, a special environmental-themed show will feature unplugged jazz musicians playing a repertoire of classic and new melodies focused on the importance of a healthy and balanced relationship. with nature, one of the hallmarks of jazz music over the years.

Tahrir Cultural Center (TCC)

AUC Tahrir Campus, Downtown, 24 Falaki Street, Downtown Cairo, Tel. 012 88721446

Ewart Memorial Hall

Thursday 3, 8 p.m.: Veronika Chi-Chi and Dmitry Galovanov and friends (Lithuania/Egypt). (9:30 p.m.) The Orchestra of the Egyptian Jazz Society with Joao Pedro Brandao Quartet (Egypt/Portugal).

Fri 4, 6:30 p.m.: Dave Meder Trio “Songs and Stories” (USA). (8 p.m.) Mary Chain and group (Germany). (9:30 p.m.) OLODUM (Brazil).

Fountain Scene

Fri 4, 2:30 p.m.: Jazzinino musicians showcase.

Cairo Jazz Club

197 July 26th Street, Agouza. Tel 02 3345 9939

Jazz beyond the stage

Thursday 3, 9:30 p.m.: Andy Ninvalle and the bad pharaohs (Holland/Egypt).

Sat 5, 9:30 p.m.: Eftekasat group (After Party).

ALEXANDRIA

Jesuit Cultural Center

298 Port Said St, Cleopatra, Sidi Gaber, Alexandria, Tel 01090958108

Thursday 38 p.m.: diver santa claus (Hungary).


Beit Al Seheimi
Al-Muaaz St, Al-Darb Al-Asfar Alley, Al-Gamalya District, Tel 02 2787 8865
Every Sunday, 7 p.m.: La Troupe du Nil for folk instruments, conducted by Abdel-Rahman Al-Shafaaiperforms Upper Egyptian dances and songs on mizmar, tabla and other traditional musical instruments.
Every Friday at 7 p.m.: “Al-Aragouz wa Khayal Al-Zel” (The Shadow Puppet), free public clown show in Al-Muaaz Street, presented by Wamda and led by Nabil Bahgat.

Cairo Opera House

Gezira Exhibition Center, Tel 02 2737 0602/2736 0361, ticket office 02 2739 0132/0144

main hall

Tue 8 and Wed 9, 8 p.m.: The Modern dance theater company present Scheherazade To display.

open air theater

Wed 9, 8 p.m.: The Cairo Opera group for chamber music Features Mahmoud Osman.

small room

Mon 7, 8 p.m.: A singing recital by Ahmad Abdel Satar.

Tuesday 8 p.m., 8 p.m.: Flute and harp recital by Reham Fayed and Mona Wassef.

Thursday 10, 8 p.m.: Rania Yehia and his band.

Al-Ghouri Caravanserai
Mohamed Abdou Street, near Al-Muaaz and Al-Azhar streets, tel. 02 2514 7475
Al Tanoura whirling dervishes perform for a living sufi music
(Performances every Saturday and Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.).

Makan

1 Saad Zaghloul St, Al-Mounira, Cairo, Tel 2792 0878

a repertoire of traditional music from the Nile delta, Al Jaafra music played by the Arab tribes of Aswan and Nass Makan bandaged.

Every Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m.: zar music and songs by Mazaher together with Umm Sameh, Umm Hassan and Nour Al-Sabah.

Al-Manara

New Cairo

Fri 4, 8 p.m.: Wegz‘s Experience is the first event of its kind that is hosted and produced by Wegz sharing and celebrating a milestone showcasing Wegz like he’s never been seen before.

The event is an immersive experience taking the audience into the spirit of Wegzsharing his musical journey through a carefully curated live performance using theatrical set design, concept-driven choreography, and high-tech CGI and light shows.

The Marquee-Cairo Festival City

New Cairo

Fri 4, 9 p.m.: Cairo steps group, led by an oud player Bassem Darwishbringing their rhythmic jazz sounds, associated with their diverse cultural origins.

Pyramids of Giza

Giza Plateau, Al-Haram

Fri 4 p.m., 7 p.m.: World-renowned classical/rock violinist daisy jopling in dynamic collaboration with Egyptian stars Hany Adel and Noha FekriEgyptian rock band Wust El Baladand AfriCairo Collective.

Room Art Space & Café
10 Etihad Al Mohamin, Garden City, Tel. 01000 068 159

Fri 4, 8 p.m.: Open Mic evening.

Sat 5, 9 p.m.: JJ Quartet is an all-Egyptian band playing thrilling rearrangements of bop and post-bop era jazz standards.

The Spot Mall, in front of AUC Gate 4, New Cairo

Thursday 109 p.m.: Dark is an opeth tribute band that strives to bring the opeth experience to fans across Egypt. Bleak will be playing the entire “Damnation” album along with some other surprises, so get ready for one hell of a night.

Sat 5 p.m., 9 p.m.: A humorous evening by Sticks.

Sun 6, 9 p.m.: Downtown Comedy give a stand-up comedy show.

Mon 7, 9 p.m.: Egyptian oud singer and player Saad El Oud presents the authentic Egyptian heritage songs with a light and distinguished Egyptian character based on audience interaction and singing.

Tuesday 8, 9 p.m.: DarQube band is an Egyptian music group that pays tribute to the well-known group imagine Dragons with their own musical style.

El-Sawy Culture Wheel
End of July 26th Street, under May 15th Bridge, Zamalek, Tel 02 2736 8881/6178/2737 4448

(No entry without a mask and the room will be open at only 25% audience capacity)

River Room

Thursday 3 p.m., 6 p.m.: Singing recital by Amira El-Bialy.

Sun 6, 7 p.m.: Singing recital by Mustapha Ghanem.

Mon 7, 6:30 p.m.: Anghamna group, led by maestro Sharif Abbass.

Tue 20, 7 p.m.: Singing recital by Souzan Mokhtar.

Wed 9, 7 p.m.: El-Saqy religious singing troupe.

Thursday 10, 7 p.m.: Pop singer mohamed adawya.

hall of wisdom

Thu 3 and Fri 4 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.: El-Sawy Culturewheel Puppet Theater The show brings Umm Kolthoum’s song concerts to life by performing two of her most beloved songs.

Fri 4, 7:30 p.m.: Violin and piano recital by Fouad and Mounib.

Sat 7, 7 p.m.: Metallica and Linkin Park tribute evening by VYRUS and FIGURE 09.

Tahrir Cultural Center (TCC)

AUC Tahrir Campus, Downtown, 24 Falaki Street, Downtown Cairo, Tel. 012 88721446

Main garden

Wed 9, 8 p.m.: Trio Teryola is led by Hany El Badrythe founder and musical director of Teryola, and a leading Egyptian nay player who uses the instrument in new creative canons.

ALEXANDRIA

Alexandria Opera House (Sayed Darwish Theatre)

Fouad Street, Mahatat Al-Raml, Alexandria, Tel 03/486 5106

Mon 7, 8 p.m.: Flamenco concert (Spain).

Alexandrina Library

Chatby, Alexandria 21526, Tel (03) 4839999

main hall

Thursday 10, 7 p.m. (open to the public): Kato Hafez Project concert.


*A version of this article appeared in the November 3, 2022 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly.

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A busy November program from ROHM https://saturova.cz/a-busy-november-program-from-rohm/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:33:00 +0000 https://saturova.cz/a-busy-november-program-from-rohm/ Muscat: The Royal Opera House Muscat is delighted to announce a packed program for November: from military pageantry to world-class virtuoso pianist Nikolai Kuznetsov in concert with ROSO, it’s an extraordinary month of performances. Military music: Oman and the World is back! With exciting appearances from France and Japan, let the range of military, police […]]]>

Muscat: The Royal Opera House Muscat is delighted to announce a packed program for November: from military pageantry to world-class virtuoso pianist Nikolai Kuznetsov in concert with ROSO, it’s an extraordinary month of performances.

Military music: Oman and the World is back! With exciting appearances from France and Japan, let the range of military, police and national bands packing the Maidan al Bahri at the opera stir and inspire you to appreciate the power of music and the value of global friendships. (November 3, 4 & 17. 7 p.m.)

Calling all discerning jazz aficionados and culture enthusiasts, ROHM is privileged to welcome Grammy Award-winning artist, Chris Botti, who has become America’s best-selling instrumental artist of all time. Botti’s unique style begins in jazz and extends beyond the boundaries of any genre. In concert, it is innovative and brilliantly entertaining. (November 10 & 11, 7 p.m.).

The month continues with a new special concert showcasing the richness of traditional Omani music, demonstrating the variety of genres from different regions and corners of Oman. Enjoy a lively, bright evening with Oman’s cultural history in traditional Omani music. (November 14. 7 p.m.)

Before the opera of the month, visitors can enjoy the second Lunch Music of the season. Enjoy the tunes of the singers of the Rossini Opera Festival in the informal setting of the Opera Galleria. Free and fantastic! (Nov. 19, 11:30 a.m.)

The Rossini Opera Festival has a reputation for producing Rossini’s repertoire without fail. In La Cambiale di Matrimonioa, a beautiful young woman in love with a penniless young man struggles with her father’s plan to marry her to a wealthy foreign business partner. Directed by Laurence Dale, directed by Alessandro Bonato, the production will be sparkling with spirit and talent. It’s a good opera to start your relationship with the genre as well as to indulge in the fast levity of Rossini’s music. (Nov. 24 & 26, 7 p.m. & 4 p.m.)

The month draws to a close with the fascinating pianist Nikolai Kuznetsov and the Royal Symphony Orchestra of Oman conducted by Alessandro Cadario in collaboration with the famous concert hall “Salle Gaveau” in Paris. A dazzling program by Beethoven and Rachmaninoff. (November 28, 7 p.m. ROHMA).

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