Orchestras – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 16:25:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saturova.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-1-150x150.png Orchestras – Saturova http://saturova.cz/ 32 32 Empire State Youth Orchestra unveils 2022-23 season https://saturova.cz/empire-state-youth-orchestra-unveils-2022-23-season/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 16:25:59 +0000 https://saturova.cz/empire-state-youth-orchestra-unveils-2022-23-season/ SCHENECTADY, ​​NY (NEWS10) – The Empire State Youth Orchestra (ESYO) has announced its 2022-2023 season. The new season, which runs from September to early June, includes 30 unique performances, fourteen ESYO and CHIME ensembles, hundreds of young musicians from upstate New York and western Massachusetts, and thousands dedicated rehearsal hours. The season begins Sunday, October […]]]>

SCHENECTADY, ​​NY (NEWS10) – The Empire State Youth Orchestra (ESYO) has announced its 2022-2023 season. The new season, which runs from September to early June, includes 30 unique performances, fourteen ESYO and CHIME ensembles, hundreds of young musicians from upstate New York and western Massachusetts, and thousands dedicated rehearsal hours.

The season begins Sunday, October 30 at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall with ESYO’s flagship symphony orchestra performing Beethoven’s 7th Symphony; a work that Beethoven described as “the glory of light through darkness”. The concert also includes Gabriella Smith’s Field Guide, a musical safari into the natural world, as well as percussion interventions in Beethoven’s piece and student-led instant composition.

Marking his first season as musical director, violinist and classical music pioneer, Etienne Abelin sees this season as a new movement in ESYO’s four-decade history. “The season builds on what makes the ESYO experience so unique,” said Abelin. “It challenges the region’s most passionate young musicians to see music-making as a joyous pursuit of musical excellence. This new season will carry this brand with a pinch of something new.

Abelin, whose musical career has spanned the globe and included performances with celebrity conductors like Claudio Abbado and Pierre Boulez and cutting-edge artists such as Fabrizio Cassol and Gabriel Prokofiev, sees the vital role youth orchestras play in our communities. . “They are connectors and bridges. It is about presenting and being here and now. And orchestras tell stories! he said.

These ideas are rooted in what Abelin calls MusicNOW; a philosophy curated by Abelin that combines existing and emerging ideas, approaches, and exercises to awaken and nurture dimensions of music education that are often underdeveloped among musicians today. MusicNOW turns musicians into movers, connectors, storytellers, improvisers and creators, says Abelin.

These dimensions influence musicality by being a counterpoint to the rigid perfectionism often associated with orchestral playing. “It allows for more curiosity and risk-taking, which are at the heart of creativity and our sense of well-being,” Abelin said. “He connects music to the movement of our bodies and our emotions. It makes our eyes shine as we breathe together and listen intently to each other,” he continued. “The young musicians of ESYO increasingly become NOW musicians who, over time, develop excellence in different ways and dimensions. They are put in the driving seat and become true leaders. It is a multi-year effort and I’m excited to launch it this season!”

Elements of MusicNOW were unveiled during a week-long residency by Woodstock-based composer and inventor of Soundpainting, Walter Thompson. Soundpainting is an innovative compositional sign language that connects music with movement using over 1500 gestures to compose music live, right now, with other musicians, dancers, actors and visual artists.

Symphony orchestra violist Peyton Roach was one of the first to try Soundpainting. “The Soundpainting was a very unique experience,” Roach said. “It was like playing a game. Every gesture of the Soundpainter translates directly into an action that the musicians perform.

Throughout the year, ESYO will host Soundpainting sets and collaborative workshops featuring guest artists and experts in storytelling, creative movement, breathing and improvisation. Audiences can experience Soundpainting and, as another MusicNOW-inspired novelty, cheerful encore performances that include choreography and often feature multiple ESYO ensembles at various ESYO concerts, including opening day with the ESYO Symphony Orchestra on October 30.

The season also includes a collaboration with RPI’s Rensselaer Orchestra with Music: Eyes, a new digital music visualization tool, the return of CBS’ Melodies of Christmas after a two-year hiatus, performances by the new chamber orchestra directed by ESYO students, the Annual Young People’s Concert on March 8, and the Lois Lyman Concerto Competition. The season ends June 4, 2023 at Carnegie Hall, a fitting finale to an exciting season.

Young musicians interested in joining ESYO this season can audition for ESYO by attending an open rehearsal this fall or by attending ESYO’s open audition at Proctors on Friday, September 30 or Saturday, October 1, 2022. Auditions are taking place each fall to fill vacancies in certain ensembles. To learn more about membership, visit the ESYO website.

FALL CONCERT SCHEDULE 2022-2023

Opening morning
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Sunday October 30, 2022, 3:00 p.m.
Troy Savings Bank Music Room

ESYO PERCUSSION SETS
Monday, November 7, 2022, 7:30 p.m.
Brown School, Schenectady

REPERTORY ORCHESTRA, STRING ORCHESTRA,
& CONCERTINO STRINGS
Sunday, November 13, 2022, 3:00 p.m.
Troy Savings Bank Music Room

YOUTH JAZZ ORCHESTRA AND REPERTOIRE JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Sunday, November 20, 2022, 3:00 p.m.
Carl B. Taylor Auditorium at SUNY Schenectady

HOLIDAYS AT ESYO

WIND ORCHESTRA
Saturday, December 10, 2022, 3 p.m.
Massry Center for the Arts at Sainte-Rose College

CHRISTMAS MELODIES
With the ESYO symphony orchestra and the melodies of the Christmas choir
From Thursday 15 December to Sunday 18 December 2022
MainStage at Proctors, Schenectady
Proceeds are donated to the Melodies Center for Childhood Cancer & Blood Disorders at Albany Medical Center.

ESYO PERCUSSION HOLIDAY CONCERT
Tuesday, December 20, 2022, 7:30 p.m.
Brown School, Schenectady

ADDITIONAL REPRESENTATIONS

YOUNG ESYO CONCERT
Wednesday, March 8, 2023, 10:30 a.m.
Main Internship at Protors

ESYO SENIORS CONCERT
Wednesday, March 8, 2023, 1:00 p.m.
Main Internship at Protors

ESYO PLAYATHON
Saturday, March 25, 2023
Crossgates Shopping Center

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AT CARNEGIE HALL
Sunday, June 4, 2023, 2:00 p.m.
Carnegie Hall, New York, NY

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Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra: Music Helps Through Turmoil https://saturova.cz/ukrainian-freedom-orchestra-music-helps-through-turmoil/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 13:22:11 +0000 https://saturova.cz/ukrainian-freedom-orchestra-music-helps-through-turmoil/ A The Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra member said she believes ‘music and love are the things that will save this world’ as she encourages others to see that her home country is more than just a conflict. Violinist Yulia Rubanova is one of 75 Ukrainian musicians who came together amid the Russian invasion of the country […]]]>
A

The Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra member said she believes ‘music and love are the things that will save this world’ as she encourages others to see that her home country is more than just a conflict.

Violinist Yulia Rubanova is one of 75 Ukrainian musicians who came together amid the Russian invasion of the country to bring a message of defiance and hope.

A new BBC documentary, Ukraine’s Musical Freedom Fighters With Clive Myrie, sees the presenter meet members of the orchestra and follow them from their practice in Ukraine to their first rehearsal as an orchestra in Warsaw for their inaugural concert in July.

The program sees Rubanova reunited with her parents in Vienna, Austria, after finally leaving their hometown of Mariupol where they remained for three months after the outbreak of war.

She explains that she did not know for two months if her parents were alive and that they survived by accident after escaping a missile attack.

The musician told the PA news agency that she immediately agreed to join the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra when she was offered a place because she wanted to be “useful” for her home country.

“This summer we were all like cultural ambassadors, we could do something, we could be useful to our country,” she said.

The orchestra toured across Europe and America over the past summer, including a performance at the Royal Albert Hall for the BBC Proms.

Rubanova said: “We went to many countries around the world and everywhere we saw that the public supported us.

“We felt this amazing energy and it’s something that matters, empowering you to move on because you’re exhausted just hearing all the terrible news.

“It’s something we needed for ourselves as well.”

She added that even before they started playing at their gigs in London, New York and Washington, they received a standing ovation which caused a stir among many musicians at the solidarity demonstration.

Rubanova told PA that music has been an important element throughout her life as she grew up as a child of musicians, but it’s something she particularly leaned on in those days. difficult in the midst of the ongoing conflict.

“In these troubled times, music is really something that helps,” she said.

“I think music and love are the things that will save this world.”

The musician added that she hopes the orchestra will help show the rest of the world that Ukraine is not just about conflict.

She said: “We had to show the world that Ukraine has talented artists.

“As 30% of the orchestra’s musicians are already part of European orchestras, they are already recognized in Europe.

“And our message to the world was that Ukraine is not just about war, Ukraine has a lot to share, like composers and many talented professional musicians. Ukraine has a very developed cultural layer.

She added, “We also had to show the world that we exist and not let the world get tired of all the bad news.

“To show that we have a lot (to share) in the scientific fields, in the cultural fields.

“We can do all of these things at a very high level and we deserve the attention and we deserve the support and the help.”

Ukrainian Musical Freedom Fighters with Clive Myrie will air on September 24 at 7:35 p.m. on BBC Two and BBC iPlayer and on BBC Four on September 25.

The Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra’s performance at the BBC Proms will also be shown on BBC Four at 10pm on September 25 and available on iPlayer.

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A Brazilian artist will join the Carmel Symphony Orchestra for a concert • Current editions https://saturova.cz/a-brazilian-artist-will-join-the-carmel-symphony-orchestra-for-a-concert-current-editions/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:51:39 +0000 https://saturova.cz/a-brazilian-artist-will-join-the-carmel-symphony-orchestra-for-a-concert-current-editions/ Carmel Symphony Orchestra musical director Janna Hymes watched Brazilian pianist and singer Clarice Assad perform a set of pieces at a concert in Maine. Hymes liked what she saw and invited her to perform with the CSO. “I was with musicians who had just come together to give this concert (in Maine),” Assad said. “The […]]]>

Carmel Symphony Orchestra musical director Janna Hymes watched Brazilian pianist and singer Clarice Assad perform a set of pieces at a concert in Maine.

Hymes liked what she saw and invited her to perform with the CSO.

“I was with musicians who had just come together to give this concert (in Maine),” Assad said. “The music was a varied combination of world music, Brazilian music, classical music and jazz. It was me on the keyboards and vocal arrangements I had written for the band I was performing. (Hymes) said she loved the music and thought it could really work with her orchestra.

Assad

Assad will make his CSO debut with the concert at 7:30 p.m. on October 8 at the Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel. The concert celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from September 15 to October 15.

“I also play Bach with them,” Assad said. “It’s not, ‘Let’s just do Latin music.’ It’s “Let’s celebrate the music for what it is”.

Assad, born in Brazil and based in Chicago, will be joined by the group Pavel & Direct Contact, based in Indianapolis. Assad said she was watching Pavel Pollanco-Safadlt in online performance.

“He’s amazing,” said Assad, who said it was his first appearance in the Indianapolis area.

Assad’s release of the album “Archetypes,” performed with his father Sérgio Assad and Chicago-based ensemble Third Coast Percussion, received nominations for the 2022 Grammy Awards for Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance and Best Contemporary Classical Composition.

“So it was a lot of fun,” Assad said.

Assad came to the United States to attend college. She studied at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

Hymes said it will be an upbeat and exciting program.

“The orchestra will be performing pieces on their own, which will be just as impressive and exciting,” Hymes said.

Hymes hasn’t worked with any of the performers before, but said she feels like she has.

“The reason I say this is that we’ve been communicating for over a year and I have a good understanding of their musical language and their performance skills,” Hymes said. “These two artists are extraordinary. They are very different, even though they are from Spanish-speaking countries, and I look forward to working with them and introducing a new type of music to our audience.

Audience members are invited to join the CSO immediately after the performance at the UNIDOS After Party, with live entertainment, dancing, appetizers, drinks and lots of fun. The party takes place in the Robert Adam Room and the East Lobby of the Palladium. Tickets are $40 per person or $75 per couple. To learn more, visit CarmelSymphony.org.

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AVAILABLE NOW | The National Symphony Orchestra publishes Beethoven’s Symphonies No. 1 and 3 https://saturova.cz/available-now-the-national-symphony-orchestra-publishes-beethovens-symphonies-no-1-and-3/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:10:32 +0000 https://saturova.cz/available-now-the-national-symphony-orchestra-publishes-beethovens-symphonies-no-1-and-3/ Released on the orchestra’s own label, this album is their first opus of the complete Beethoven symphonies under the direction of Gianandrea Noseda The album was released on Washington, DC’s National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) own label which was launched in 2020 in collaboration with the London Symphony Orchestrathe label, LSO Live. NSO’s debut album, Dvořàk’s […]]]>

Released on the orchestra’s own label, this album is their first opus of the complete Beethoven symphonies under the direction of Gianandrea Noseda

The album was released on Washington, DC’s National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) own label which was launched in 2020 in collaboration with the London Symphony Orchestrathe label, LSO Live. NSO’s debut album, Dvořàk’s Symphony No. 9, debuted at number four on the Traditional classic board Billboard.

Now available, the first installment of their complete cycle of Beethoven symphonies includes the first and third symphonies.

During the 2021/22 season, NSO and its musical director Gianandrea Noseda performed Beethoven’s symphonies 1, 3, 4 and 5. They will complete the remainder of Beethoven’s nine symphonies in May and June 2023. Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3 on the album were recorded live in January 2022 at Kennedy Center’s Concert Hall.

Symphonies Nos. 4 and 5 will be released in the spring of 2023. Following the digital releases of each album on the NSO label, a physical box set of all nine symphonies will be available in 2024.

“Every time I tackle a new cycle of Beethoven symphonies, it’s a major challenge,” Noseda said of this album. in the press release. “Beethoven’s power can be a shadow or a light that embraces all centuries… Listeners will experience the bold assertion of Symphony No. 1 and the bolder assertion of Symphony No. 3 Both are immense works and announce the beginning of our journey to climb this musical Everest.

Additionally, the album includes artwork by the Kennedy Center’s first Artist-in-Residence. Mo Willemswho created nine visual responses to each of Beethoven’s nine symphonies.

“The idea of ​​creating art specifically to view while listening to Beethoven’s symphonies required me to spend a year researching, listening and painting,” Willems explained. “The result is nine abstractions, a work of visual art for each symphony, rendered in panels, the sizes of which represent the lengths of each movement. Thanks to this project, I got to know Beethoven in a new way.

To buy and listen to the album, click on here.

A video presenting the album can be seen below.

Italian conductor Noseda has been leading the ONS since 2017. His contract with the orchestra has been extended until the 2026/27 season which will mark his tenth year with the ONS. Noseda is NSO’s seventh music director, joining former executives Christoph Eschenbach, Leonard Slatkin, Mstislav Rostropovich, Antal Doráti, Howard Mitchell and Hans Kindler in this role.

Founded in 1931, the 96-member ONS became an artistic subsidiary of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 1968, where he has performed season-long subscription concerts since the Center opened in 1971. NSO airs regularly on PBS, medici.tv, and Classical WETA 90.9FM.

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Sherman Symphony Orchestra Receives NEA Grant – Herald Democrat https://saturova.cz/sherman-symphony-orchestra-receives-nea-grant-herald-democrat/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 11:30:06 +0000 https://saturova.cz/sherman-symphony-orchestra-receives-nea-grant-herald-democrat/ staff reports The Sherman Symphony Orchestra received a $10,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support its educational outreach programs. “The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to support organizations across the country, including the Sherman Symphony Orchestra. The arts help communities thrive,” said Maria Rosario Jackson, PhD., president of the […]]]>

staff reports

The Sherman Symphony Orchestra received a $10,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support its educational outreach programs.

“The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to support organizations across the country, including the Sherman Symphony Orchestra. The arts help communities thrive,” said Maria Rosario Jackson, PhD., president of the National Endowment for the Arts. “Meaningful engagement with the arts can have many benefits, from contributing to collective healing and mutual understanding, to strengthening local economies.”

The Sherman Symphony’s educational programs engage developing minds by providing affordable, high-quality music education, said conductor Daniel Dominick. Since 2002, the Grade 5 Children’s Educational Concert has been many students’ first live orchestral experience: 2,000 students each year learn about instrument families, concert etiquette, and various genres of music. Additionally, up to 400 students attend classical music concerts each year through the free student ticket program. Sherman High School media students have the unique opportunity to record concerts from the Classic Series through Symphony’s broadcast partnership with local news channel KXII.

While band programs are common in Grayson County, Sherman hosts the only string orchestra program. Most of Sherman’s orchestra students face economic challenges: 68% of Sherman ISD students are economically disadvantaged and only 15% of orchestra students receive private lessons. Since 2019, all students of the Sherman Orchestra have benefited from sections with symphonic musicians through the SSO Fellows. Practice Partners is an after-school peer mentoring program that pairs beginning orchestral students with high school string players for monthly practice sessions. Second and fourth graders enjoy chamber music presentations and performances as musical chairs bring Sherman Symphony musicians to area schools., Austin College Summer Music Camp—a collaboration between the Sherman Symphony and Austin College—is a middle school and high school day camp that cultivates music development through the rehearsal and performance of chamber music.

“We are thrilled to be able to continue to support student education with a wide variety of musical experiences,” said Leslie Whelan, SSO Director of Education. “The Sherman Symphony Orchestra was founded with the intention of sharing music and educational opportunities with students in the greater Texoma area, and this grant allows us to continue our mission in a rapidly growing community.

From the first Summer Music Camp in 2022, Daniel Dominick, conductor of the Sherman Symphony, talks to students about the music that awaits them. Courtesy picture

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Royal Philharmonic Orchestra: review of Leoncavallo’s Zingari album – rich in tone https://saturova.cz/royal-philharmonic-orchestra-review-of-leoncavallos-zingari-album-rich-in-tone/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 06:00:50 +0000 https://saturova.cz/royal-philharmonic-orchestra-review-of-leoncavallos-zingari-album-rich-in-tone/ Few operas by great Italian composers have been premiered in London. One of them is Zingarian act verism opera by Leoncavallo, best known for Pagliacci. The premiere took place in 1912 at the Hippodrome, a variety theater praised at the time for its (very current) policy of “levelling” popular taste for music. The London public […]]]>

Few operas by great Italian composers have been premiered in London. One of them is Zingarian act verism opera by Leoncavallo, best known for Pagliacci. The premiere took place in 1912 at the Hippodrome, a variety theater praised at the time for its (very current) policy of “levelling” popular taste for music.

The London public took to Zingari with enthusiasm and his verdict was soon supported by the public in Germany and Italy, in North and South America. Now, however, opera is almost never seen live.

Although not her first release on record, Opera Rara’s recording, made after a concert last year, has a unique selling point. The opera underwent revisions after London, but this recording returns to the original score with lost orchestrations newly prepared by Martin Fitzpatrick.

The ultra-thin plot, derived from Pushkin, is a double love story between Roma. Fleana begins the opera in love with the noble Radu, but ends it with a poetess, Tamar, and their various love duets weave their way through the score, giving it a warmly romantic feel. It’s only when jealousy lifts its head that the opera spins verismending in a deadly conflagration.

As always, Opera Rara’s performance and accompanying packaging are of the highest standard. Krassimira Stoyanova makes a fiery Fleana, torn between the attentions of Arsen Soghomonyan’s Radu, a romantically styled tenor, and his baritone rival Tamar, Stephen Gaertner. Carlo Rizzi conducts a Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with rich tones.

★★★★☆

Leoncavallo: Zingari‘ is published by Opera Rara

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Orchestra Announces New Season – Monett Times https://saturova.cz/orchestra-announces-new-season-monett-times/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 02:34:49 +0000 https://saturova.cz/orchestra-announces-new-season-monett-times/ BY MURRAY BISHOFF, LEAD CONTRIBUTOR mbishoff@cherryroad.com Rehearsals began Sept. 6 at the Monett High School Performing Arts Center for the Ozark Festival Orchestra’s 43rd season, under the direction of its new Music Director, Alexandra Kovatch. Kovatch succeeds Todd Borgmann, who stepped down in April after seven seasons. Borgmann agreed to stay on as an OFO […]]]>

BY MURRAY BISHOFF, LEAD CONTRIBUTOR

mbishoff@cherryroad.com

Rehearsals began Sept. 6 at the Monett High School Performing Arts Center for the Ozark Festival Orchestra’s 43rd season, under the direction of its new Music Director, Alexandra Kovatch.

Kovatch succeeds Todd Borgmann, who stepped down in April after seven seasons. Borgmann agreed to stay on as an OFO board member, the first music director to do so.

For the first time in three years, the OFO plans to mount a full season of four concerts. The concerts will again take place on Sunday afternoon. This first concert, “Songs of the Stage: Favorites from Opera and Broadway”, will take place at 3 p.m. on October 9.

December’s concert, “Winter Wonderland: Holiday Celebration,” will take place at 3 p.m. on December 4, with weekly rehearsals beginning October 25.

The February concert, “Love Is In The Air,” which will also continue the tradition of concerts by young artists, will take place at 3 p.m. on February 19, 2023.

The final concert will again be the popular Pops in the Park gala on April 16, 2023 at the Monett City Park Casino. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. and music starts at 2:15 p.m. The selections for this concert will revolve around “Sounds of the Heartland,” featuring music by American composers and “other Old West favorites.”

Kovatch has scheduled six weekly rehearsals at 7:15 p.m. on Tuesdays, usually at the MHS Performing Arts Center. Rehearsals for the December concert will begin on October 25, January 7 for the February concert and March 14 for the Pops concert.

Musicians are welcome to attend rehearsals and play in the orchestra, depending on their abilities and the need for specific instruments in the chosen selections. Questions regarding OFO play can be directed to Kovatch at ackovatch@gmail.conr.

Kovatch has been Director of Orchestras at Drury University Springfield since 2020, as well as Director of the Springfield Chamber Orchestra. She has conducted other ensembles and will soon perform with the Kansas City Civic Orchestra. She holds a Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting from Missouri State University. As an instrumentalist, she plays the harp.

In scheduling music for an upcoming gig, Kovatch said it had to be challenging enough to be interesting for the band to play, but also achievable.

“There needs to be a good musical balance throughout the season, including different styles of music and composers,” she said. “It’s fun to have a general theme for a concert. A concert should have music that the audience will enjoy listening to and the orchestra will enjoy playing.

She sees less of a divide between “classic” and “pop” music, which shows in the way she chose the music for the upcoming OFO season.

“I think it makes it exciting for the audience and appeals to more people, especially audience members who may not be as familiar with all of the standard literature,” Kovatch said. “In the spring, OFO will do an Americana concert; it will feature themes from Western films, American folk songs, but also music from composers such as Aaron Copland, Scott Joplin and Florence Price. I like to have a general theme that brings together popular and traditional music.

Kovatch said working with smaller orchestras, such as the Sedalia Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestra of Allentown, Penn., had an impact on her.

“It made me realize that the most important thing is the needs of the orchestra and giving the orchestra good experiences,” she said. “If the music needs a little re-orchestration to fit your band’s instrumentation, but in return they’re going to learn and have a ton of fun, then it’s worth it.

“A community orchestra is made up of all these lovely people who give their time to come and make music. They get nothing out of it but the joy of making music to the best of their abilities and I think that’s what the goal should be. I’m here to guide the process and help them perform at their best and make sure it’s a good experience for everyone.

While male bandleaders have historically dominated the music industry, Kovatch has found audiences and players receptive to his work. She is the second woman to hold the position with OFO, following Dr. Amy Mucbnick, who served as r997-r999.

“Really, we’re all about making music – it’s not about me,” Kovatch said. “So when we are focused on the music and have a common goal, none of that matters. Deciding what makes a conductor ‘good’ or ‘bad’ can be difficult and extremely biased, as there are many approaches and leadership styles.

“I think it’s about being able to guide the orchestra through the music and lead them to the best possible outcome, to challenge them to grow as a musician and to give their best while creating a positive environment; and to be absolutely technically clear while conveying a musical idea that inspires musicians as well as audiences. I will do my best to accomplish all these things with OFO.

The Ozark Festival Orchestra will have a new website this year and will continue to offer concert updates on its Facebook page, as well as in The Monett Times. Admission to concerts will continue at $10 for adults, $5 for seniors, and free for high school students and under. A 50i(c)3 non-profit organization, OFO is supported by sponsors, memberships and donations, purchased advertising in its program, and funds managed by the Monett Community Foundation.

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Summerville Nonprofit Hires Key Executive > Charleston Business Journal https://saturova.cz/summerville-nonprofit-hires-key-executive-charleston-business-journal/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 12:32:51 +0000 https://saturova.cz/summerville-nonprofit-hires-key-executive-charleston-business-journal/ The Summerville Orchestra has announced that DeAnndra Glenn is the inaugural Director and Education Coordinator of the new Summerville Orchestra Youth Philharmonic and Educational Program. Glenn has taught strings to students of all ages in the Charleston area since 2005 and has performed with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, the North Charleston POPS! and with Mannheim […]]]>

The Summerville Orchestra has announced that DeAnndra Glenn is the inaugural Director and Education Coordinator of the new Summerville Orchestra Youth Philharmonic and Educational Program.

Glenn has taught strings to students of all ages in the Charleston area since 2005 and has performed with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, the North Charleston POPS! and with Mannheim Steamroller, Michael Bublé and Michael W. Smith among many others, according to a press release from the orchestra.

She was conductor of the Charleston County School District Honors Orchestra from 2005 to 2010 and served for seven years as a string instructor for the county school district’s SMAART (Students Mastering the Academic Arts) summer program. of Charleston and the middle and high schools of West Ashley. , the statement said.

Glenn founded the Charleston Violin Studio, and many of his violin and viola students have been admitted to Charleston County School District School of the Arts, Rollings School of the Arts, All-State Orchestras of the Lowcountry and South Carolina and the Charleston Symphony Youth Orchestra. , according to the press release.

“When I was a student, each new orchestra I joined was a stepping stone to the next level. At first I would have a hard time keeping up,” Glenn said in the statement. “But with practice and determination, my game improved. The orchestra pushed me to become a better musician because I had to learn to stay with the band.

Glenn stopped directing and teaching when her twins – a boy and a girl – were born and is now thrilled to be able to re-engage, the statement said.

“I love directing and directing orchestra rehearsals. The Summerville Orchestra Youth Philharmonic will be a wonderful opportunity for students to make new friends while developing their musicality,” she said. “Playing in an ensemble teaches students to work in teams and also helps them learn other life skills. Additionally, participation in extracurricular activities also looks impressive on a college application.

Glenn and SO staff will work with area school music instructors to identify and audition students for participation. Auditions will be held Monday, September 19, 6-7 p.m., at Alston Middle School, 500 Bryan St., Summerville. More information is available here.

The SO Youth Philharmonic is made possible by a grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission. The mission of the Youth Philharmonic Program is to provide an affordable youth orchestra experience for public, private, and charter school students as well as home-schooled students in all three counties. The Youth Philharmonic Orchestra is to give three concerts this year.

Contact Jason at 864-568-7570.

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Gemma New begins final season with the Dallas Orchestra – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://saturova.cz/gemma-new-begins-final-season-with-the-dallas-orchestra-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 14:04:31 +0000 https://saturova.cz/gemma-new-begins-final-season-with-the-dallas-orchestra-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Gemma New begins her fourth and final season as Principal Guest Conductor of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra with a dream concert series featuring The planets by Gustav Holst, from September 15 to 17 at the Meyerson Symphony Center in the Dallas Arts District. New made her debut with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in fall 2019. […]]]>

Gemma New begins her fourth and final season as Principal Guest Conductor of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra with a dream concert series featuring The planets by Gustav Holst, from September 15 to 17 at the Meyerson Symphony Center in the Dallas Arts District.

New made her debut with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in fall 2019. In November 2019, she participated in the orchestra’s first annual Women in Classical Music Symposium, taking part in a panel discussion on issues important to working women. in the music industry.

This year marks a new chapter in the career of the New Zealand-born conductor, having been appointed Artistic Advisor and Principal Conductor of the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (NZSO). The 2022-2023 season is New’s eighth season as Music Director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra (HPO) in Ontario. She received the 2021 Sir Georg Solti Directing Award.

Sylvia Elzafon

The 2022-23 season will be New’s final season as Principal Guest Conductor of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.

The concert opens with What keeps me awake by Angélica Negrón, composer in residence of the orchestra. Pianist Olga Kern will perform Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini with the orchestra. Holst’s The planets concludes the performance, with the women of the Dallas Symphony Chorus contributing to the sequel’s quiet, otherworldly conclusion.

New discussions about the concert series, his time in Dallas and his future.

BNC DFW: What excites you the most about this upcoming program? How do the works of Negron, Rachmaninoff and Holst complement each other?

Gem New: There is something for everyone in this program! Much of this program is inspired by wondrous dreams and mysteries. We first encounter the buzzing, atmospheric Negron, inspired by the creative thoughts swirling in the composer’s head as she falls asleep. The Rachmaninoff has the perfect blend of snazzy entertainment and romantic song. And the Holst planets approach popular song and dance, as well as the character of each planet in its sound universes.

BNC DFW: Holst’s The planets is famous. Do you have a favorite planet (musically speaking)?

LARP: Honestly, I love every planet! Maybe Jupiter is my favorite. Each idea is so warm, positive and enveloping.

BNC DFW: Since your time at the DSO, how do you think you have evolved or changed as a conductor?

LARP: One of the best things about this career path is that we can constantly challenge, experiment, and grow. Work with the DSO on a repertoire as rich and vibrant as that of Debussy The seaSymphonic Dances by Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev Romeo and Juliet — and this year we’re playing Holst’s The planets and Stravinsky Rite of Spring together – these are experiences that I take with me to the next performance of the play.

BNC DFW: What did you like the most about your stay in Dallas?

LARP: I loved working with the orchestra in such an inspiring space with an enthusiastic audience.

NBC DFW: When you arrived at the DSO, you took part in the orchestra’s first Women in Classical Music symposium. How do you think the industry has changed for women over the past few years?

LARP: I think it becomes much more normal to have a woman on the podium. I hope this will become common in the future.

Gemma New was a panelist at the Dallas Symphony Orchestras Women in Classical Music Symposium_photo by Sylvia Elzafon

Sylvia Elzafon

New participated in the orchestra’s first annual Women in Classical Music Symposium in 2019.

BNC DFW: After this last season with the DSO, what does the future hold for you?

LARP: I enjoyed working with the DSO so much, and I’m sure we’ll see each other again in the future. I am enjoying a busy career with my new position at the NZSO, continuing my work with the HPO in Canada and as a frequent guest conductor in North America and Europe. I hope to conduct a lot more opera and look forward to doing more work in this area.

Learn more: Dallas Symphony Orchestra

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The Boston Symphony Orchestra prepares to kick off the season https://saturova.cz/the-boston-symphony-orchestra-prepares-to-kick-off-the-season/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:50:00 +0000 https://saturova.cz/the-boston-symphony-orchestra-prepares-to-kick-off-the-season/ From Bach in September to Shostakovich in May, the Boston Symphony Orchestra will take audiences on a far-reaching musical journey when the BSO begins its season in Boston on September 22, which also includes several free chamber music concerts in Western Massachusetts throughout the season. . “I can’t wait for next season to focus on […]]]>

From Bach in September to Shostakovich in May, the Boston Symphony Orchestra will take audiences on a far-reaching musical journey when the BSO begins its season in Boston on September 22, which also includes several free chamber music concerts in Western Massachusetts throughout the season. .

“I can’t wait for next season to focus on the power of music to touch our hearts and reveal the many stories and emotions that bring us together as a human family,” said Andris Nelsons, conductor and musical director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, earlier this year. BSO season in Boston. “We welcome an extraordinary array of composers and artists who will share their unique musical perspectives with the orchestra and our audience. We invite everyone, long-time spectators and newcomers alike, to join us for a brilliant and captivating 2022-2023 Boston Symphony Orchestra season! »

Three free community chamber concerts will take place on three Sundays throughout the season at the Linde Center on the Tanglewood grounds in Lenox. The three free Sunday concerts will take place on October 16, March 12 and May 14.

Two additional free community chamber concerts will take place on Sunday in central and western Massachusetts:

  • October 23 at First Baptist Church in Worcester
  • March 26 at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams

All free Sunday community concerts begin at 3 p.m. Complimentary tickets must be reserved in advance on the Boston Symphony Orchestra website – www.bso.org

The Boston Symphony Orchestra‘s season at Symphony Hall, Boston begins September 22 and 23 with the BSO debut of American pianist Awadagin Pratt performing JS Bach’s “Piano Concerto in A” and the “Rounds” for piano and Jessie Montgomery’s String Orchestra”, conducted by Andris Nelsons. The opening night program also includes Gustav Holst’s “The Planets” and “A Toast!” by John Williams, which was written by Williams in 2014 to celebrate Nelsons’ arrival as musical director of the BSO.

The BSO then hosts a Symphony Hall gala on September 24 featuring the famous pianist Lang Lang in Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Piano Concerto No. 2”.

Next week, from September 29 to October 1, another renowned pianist, Yuja Wang, will perform Dmitri Shostakovich’s Piano Concertos No. 1 and 2. The same concerts will also feature Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 100, with BSO principal trumpeter Thomas Rolfs.

A recent work by American composer Elizabeth Ogonek opens the next program in the BSO’s fall schedule, October 6-8. The Nelsons-directed program also includes Leonard Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms” with the Tanglewood Festival Chorus and Bernstein’s “Serenade” for violin and orchestra, as well as Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 3”.

Pianist Emanuel Ax, a long-time collaborator of the BSO, will perform Mozart’s “Piano Concerto No. 18” from October 13 to 15. The same concerts will also feature Tchaikovsky’s overture to “Romeo and Juliet” and the sequel to “The Miraculous Mandarin” by Bela Bartok and folk music inspired by composer George Enescu’s “Romanian Rhapsody”.

Mahler’s monumental Sixth Symphony is the only piece on the October 20-22 program under Nelsons.

The following week, another highly respected pianist, Mitsuko Uchida, joined the BSO and Nelsons from October 27-30 for the first concert in a multi-year collaboration featuring Beethoven’s five piano concertos. These concerts feature Beethoven’s magnificent Piano Concerto No. 5 (nicknamed the “Emperor’s” concerto) as well as Shostakovich’s powerful Fifth Symphony.

Two popular plays as well as a new work take center stage on November 3rd. Nelsons and the BSO will perform Mozart’s “40 Symphony” and Richard Strauss’ captivating “Alpine Symphony,” as well as the orchestral version of “Punctum,” which the BSO premiered last summer at Tanglewood .

After a concert tour of Asia, the BSO returns to Boston for two performances on November 25 and 26 under the direction of BSO Deputy Conductor Anna Rakitina. The program includes Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition”, Rachmaninoff’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” with pianist Inon Barnatan, and the opera suite “Figaro Obtains a Divorce” by Elena Langer.

The second half of the BSO season kicks off January 5-7 next year with performances of Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto” featuring violinist Midori performing with the BSO in Boston for the first time since 2003. The same program also includes two popular works by Beethoven – the funeral march from his third ‘Eroica’ symphony and the overture to Beethoven’s ‘Leonora’.

BSO Concerts January 12-14 feature conductor Alan Gilbert and frequent BSO guest artist, pianist Garrick Ohlsson, performing the premiere of Justin Dello Joio’s specially written ‘Oceans Apart’ piano concerto for Ohlson. The same program also includes “Carnival Overture” by Dvorak.

Audiences will also have the chance to hear Dvorak next week when the BSO performs his symphonic poem “Wood Dove” from January 19-21, as well as Karel Szymanowski’s Violin Concerto No. 2 with violinist Nicola Benedetti in his debut. at BSO. with conductor Karina Canellakis for her Symphony Hall debut. The program also includes Witold Lutoslawski’s “Concerto for Orchestra”.

New music takes center stage January 26-28 when the BSO presents the world premiere of BSO-commissioned ‘Concerto for Curved Space’ by composer Steven Mackey conducted by Andris Nelsons. The concerts also feature Latvian violinist Baiba Skride performing Shostakovich’s “Violin Concerto No. 2” and Brahms’ majestic Fourth Symphony.

And Wagner fans! Note February 2 and 4. The BSO, Nelsons and several singers will perform an all-Wagner program including the Overture, Act III and other music from Wagner’s first opera, “Tannhauser.”

The February 9-12 concerts feature the BSO debut of English cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason in Ernest Bloch’s 1916 “Schelomo” (King Solomon). The same concert also includes the world premiere of a new work by Carlos Simon and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

Conductor Lahav Shani makes his Symphony Hall debut from February 16 to 18 with French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet performing Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Egyptian Piano Concerto No. 5” as well as the delightful First Symphony by Prokofiev and Rachmaninoff’s “Symphonic Dances”. ”

Conductor Andre Raphel makes his BSO debut March 3-5 with Uri Caine’s gospel and popular music ‘The Passion of Octavius ​​Catto’, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s ‘Little Concert Suite’ and William Grant Still’s “Symphony No. 1”.

From March 9-11, conductor Thomas Wilkins leads the BSO and clarinetist Anthony McGill in Anthony Davis’ “You Have the Right to Remain Silent” concerto. Other works on the program include Margaret Bonds’ spiritually-based ‘Montgomery Variations’ and William Dawson’s ‘Negro Folk Symphony’.

Concerts from March 16-18 will feature conductor Giancarlo Guerrero leading the BSO in Henryk Górecki’s Symphony No. 3, as well as Julia Wolfe’s BSO co-commissioned work “Her Story”, featuring female vocal group Lorelei Ensemble.

Composer Thomas Ades conducts two of his own works from March 23-25 ​​- the “Inferno” suite and “Paradiso” from the ballet score for The Dante Project – as well as Igor Stravinsky’s “Persephone”.

BSO assistant conductor Earl Lee makes his full program debut at Symphony Hall April 6-8 with Robert Schumann’s Second Symphony and Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 with pianist Eric Lu. The program also includes Unsuk Chin’s brief concert work, “Subito Con Forza”, which translates to “suddenly, with power”.

Andris Nelsons conducts the American premiere from April 13-15 of a new work for cello and orchestra by French organist-composer Thierry Escaich, written for soloist Gautier Capuçon. On the same program, “Alborada del gracioso” by Maurice Ravel and the exuberant Symphony No. 2 by Rachmaninov.

The BSO concerts from April 20-22 feature Nelsons conducting two works by Jean Sibelius – Symphony No. 5 and Sibelius’s first work “Luonnotar” – as well as Thomas Ades Sibelius-inspired “Air” for violin and orchestra, a co-commission of the BSO. work written especially for the soloist Anne-Sophie Mutter.

The BSO concerts from April 28 to 29 mark the return of the famous South Korean pianist Seong-Jin Cho performing Maurice Ravel’s “Piano Concerto in G Major”. The same program also includes music by Igor Stravinsky for the 1911 ballet ‘Petrushka’ and the world premiere of ‘Punctum’ by American composer Caroline Shaw.

And the BSO’s final concerts of the May 4-6 season will feature violinist Augustin Hadelich performing Benjamin Britten’s “Violin Concerto” with the BSO, as well as Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 13, Babi Yar, based on poems by Yevgeny Yevteshenko.

For information on upcoming Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts or to order tickets, visit www.bso.org

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